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ESPN: Mormon athlete Jabari Parker's family to limit media availability for the summer

Published: Wednesday, July 29 2015 12:20 p.m. MDT

In this photo taken Thursday, April 12, 2012, in Chicago, Simeon Career Academy's Jabari Parker, walks down the school's hallway after he is named the Gatorade National Boys Basketball Player of the Year. Parker does not seek the material trophies and medals with his basketball success, on the contrary, Parker would give them to kids following him after big games as a token of appreciation, so the coaches now grab them from him quickly. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green) (M. Spencer Green, ASSOCIATED PRESS) In this photo taken Thursday, April 12, 2012, in Chicago, Simeon Career Academy's Jabari Parker, walks down the school's hallway after he is named the Gatorade National Boys Basketball Player of the Year. Parker does not seek the material trophies and medals with his basketball success, on the contrary, Parker would give them to kids following him after big games as a token of appreciation, so the coaches now grab them from him quickly. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green) (M. Spencer Green, ASSOCIATED PRESS)

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Related article: Sports Illustrated writer Jeff Benedict grateful for the opportunity to share Jabari Parker story with the world

Our take: You've probably seen our stories on LDS athlete and highly touted basketball recruit Jabari Parker, and you may have read author Jeff Benedict's cover story on Parker in Sports Illustrated. But that may be all you hear about the 6-foot-9 hoops star for a while. ESPN Chicago reports:

"Basketball never stops, so we're getting ready to shut it down for him," Parker's father, Sonny, said. "He just wants to continue to be a kid, watch cartoons, hang out with a friends and everything.

Jeff Benedict and Jabari Parker. (Photo by Jeff Benedict) Jeff Benedict and Jabari Parker. (Photo by Jeff Benedict)

"I think Jabari is the first (high school) player who has experienced this social media stuff. LeBron (James) and Kobe (Bryant) never experienced that. Jabari can't go to the bathroom without being on Twitter. It's the first time a player of his caliber you know he plays a game, gets out of the shower and he's on YouTube."

Sonny said all the attention has gotten to his son.

"It's overwhelming," Sonny said. "It could be a distraction sometimes because he still has to stay in the same routine. I think the distractions sometimes can get overwhelming."

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