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This day in sports history

Published: Saturday, Sept. 5 2015 7:03 a.m. MDT

Aug. 28

1908 — Fred McLeod wins the U.S. Open golf title with a one-stroke victory over Willie Smith in a playoff.

1922 — The oldest American international team golf match, the Walker Cup, is established with the United States beating Britain 8-4.

1949 — The United States wins the Davis Cup, beating Australia 4-1.

1956 — Australia sweeps the United States 5-0 to capture the Davis Cup.

1959 — Bye Bye Byrd sets a world record for the mile pace on a half-mile track in 1:57 4-5 at Roosevelt Raceway.

1976 — The Toronto Metros win the NASL championship with a 3-0 victory over the Minnesota Kicks.

1993 — Pinch-hitter Jeremy Hess' bases-loaded single with two outs in the sixth inning gives Long Beach, Calif. a 3-2 victory over Panama in the championship game of the Little League World Series.

1994 — Tiger Woods, 18, becomes the youngest winner in the history of the U.S. Amateur Golf Championship, capturing the last three holes of his 36-hole title match against Trip Kuehne.

1995 — Monica Seles, plays in her first Grand Slam tournament in more than 2 1-2 years and beats Ruxandra Dragomir 6-3, 6-1 in first round of the U.S. Open.

1999 — South Africa's Penny Heyns, racing alone in a special 50-meter breaststroke time trial, breaks her eighth world record in 11 swims during the Pan Pacific championships. Heyns, who attempted the 50 after breaking three 100 and four 200 records in the past six weeks, clocks 30.83 seconds to beat her 30.95 set at the Goodwill Games in New York last August. Twelve records are broken — at least one in seven straight days — in the pool to be used for the 2000 Summer Games.

2005 — Michael Memea's home run in the bottom of the seventh caps a stunning comeback to give West Oahu of Ewa Beach, Hawaii, the Little League World Series title. Memea's solo shot gave his team a 7-6 win over the defending champions from Willemstad, Curacao, and was the first game-ending home run in a Little League championship game.

2008 — In one of the biggest upsets in the sport's history, top-seeded Ana Ivanovic is ousted from the U.S. Open. Ivanovic is beaten by 188th-ranked Julie Coin 6-3, 4-6, 6-3 in the second round. Never before in the Open era that began in 1968 had the No. 1 woman lost this early in the tournament.

2009 — Russian pole vaulter Yelena Isinbayeva bounces back from losing her world title by setting a world record of 16 feet, 7 1/4 inches in the Weltklasse meet in Zurich.

Aug. 29

1885 — John L. Sullivan wins the first world heavyweight title under the Marquess of Queensbury rules when he beats Dominic McCaffrey in six rounds.

1962 — A.C.'s Viking, driven by Sanders Russell, wins the Hambletonian Stakes in straight heats.

1973 — Flirth, driven by Ralph Baldwin, wins the Hambletonian Stakes in straight heats.

1974 — Nineteen-year-old high school basketball star Moses Malone, signs a contract with the Utah Stars of the ABA to become the first player to go directly from high school into major professional basketball.

1987 — Charlie Whittingham becomes the first trainer to surpass 500 stakes wins when he sent Ferdinand to victory in the Cabrillo Handicap at Del Mar Racetrack.

1993 — Laffit Pincay Jr. wins the 8,000th race of his career aboard El Toreo in the seventh race at Del Mar racetrack to become the second thoroughbred jockey to ride 8,000 winners.

1993 — Brandie Burton's 20-foot birdie putt on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff edges Betsy King for the du Maurier Classic title, the LPGA tour's final major of the season.

1998 — Toms River, N.J., wins its first Little League World Series with a 12-9 victory over Kashima, Japan. Chris Cardone hits home runs in consecutive at-bats — including the game-deciding two-run shot.

2000 — Second-seeded Gustavo Kuerten, the reigning French Open king, is beaten 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (1) by qualifier Wayne Arthurs in the U.S. Open. Kuerten is the second No. 2 seed to be eliminated in the first round since 1956.

2000 — Anaheim's Darin Erstad goes 3-for-5 to reach 200 hits faster than any player in 65 years as the Angels beat Toronto 9-4.

2002 — Mark Bellhorn becomes the first player in NL history to hit a home run in the same inning from both sides of the plate. The homers come in the fourth of the Chicago Cubs' 13-10 win over Milwaukee.

2005 — Russian Svetlana Kuznetsova becomes the first U.S. Open defending women's champion to fall in the first round, losing 6-3, 6-2 to fellow Russian Ekaterina Bychkova on the first day of the U.S. Open.

2007 — Bernard Lagat, an American citizen since 2004, is the first U.S. runner to win a world 1,500-meter championship. No American had won an Olympic gold medal in the event since Mel Sheppard in 1908.

2010 — Kenya's David Rudisha sets a world record in the 800 meters for the second time in a week at the Rieti Grand Prix. Rudisha clocks 1:41.01 in the two-lap race, shaving 0.08 seconds off the mark he set last weekend in Berlin.

2010 — The Little League aces from Japan end the United States' five-year reign as World Series champions. The team from Tokyo limit Waipahu, Hawaii, to four singles, and get a homer and three RBIs from Konan Tomori to take the Little League World Series title with a 4-1 victory.

Aug. 30

1926 — Guy McKinney, driven by Nat Ray, wins the first Hambletonian Stakes.

1937 — Joe Louis wins a 15-round unanimous decision over Tommy Farr at Yankee Stadium in the first defense of his heavyweight title.

1961 — Harlan Dean, driven by Jimmy Arthur, wins the Hambletonian Stakes and sets a record for combined time in the two heats at 3:57 2-5.

1981 — Bill Shoemaker becomes the first jockey to win a $1 million race when he rode John Henry to a nose victory over The Bart in the inaugural Arlington Million at Arlington Park.

1986 — Dawn Patrol and Falcon Bret record the fastest dead heat at Roosevelt Raceway at 1:58.1.

1987 — Ben Johnson of Canada sets the world record in the 100 meters bettering Calvin Smith's 4-year-old mark of 9.93 by 0.10 seconds in the World Track and Field Championships in Rome. Johnson later lost the record because of steroid use.

1991 — Mike Powell smashes Bob Beamon's world long jump record with a leap of 29 feet, 4½ inches, two inches beyond the record, in the World Track and Field Championships in Tokyo. The leap also ends Carl Lewis' 10-year, 65-meet winning streak.

2001 — Ashley Martin becomes the first woman to play in a Division I football game, kicking three extra points without a miss to help I-AA Jacksonville State hand Cumberland its 18th straight loss, 71-10.

2005 — Andy Roddick has a shocking first-round exit from the U.S. Open against Gilles Muller, a player making his debut in the tournament. Roddick, the champion two years earlier and the No. 4 seed this year, falls 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 7-6 (1) on his 23rd birthday to the first man from Luxembourg to compete in the Open.

2006 — Curt Schilling becomes the 14th pitcher in major league history to reach 3,000 strikeouts when he fans Oakland's Nick Swisher in the first inning of the Red Sox's 7-2 loss to Oakland.

2007 — Tyson Gay completes a sprint double at the world championships when he wins the 200 meters in 19.76 seconds. Gay's time breaks the meet record of 19.79 set 12 years ago by American Michael Johnson in Goteborg, Sweden. Gay, who beat world record holder Asafa Powell in the 100, joins Maurice Greene (1999) and Justin Gatlin (2005) as the only male athletes to have won sprint doubles at the championships.

2009 — For the second straight year, the U.S. Amateur crowns the youngest champion in a history that dates to 1895. Byeong Hun-An defeats Clemson senior Ben Martin 7 and 5 in the 36-hole final. An, who turns 18 on Sept. 17 and is the second straight champion born in South Korea, is about a month and a half younger than Danny Lee was when he broke Tiger Woods' record last year to become the U.S. Amateur's youngest champion. Lee was 18 years, 1 month old when he won.

2010 — The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency suspends sprinter Mark Jelks for two years after violating the doping agency's rules governing out-of-competition tests. Jelks fails twice to file a quarterly notice of his location and misses a test during an 18-month period, prompting the ban.

Aug. 31

1895 — The first professional football game is played at Latrobe, Pa., between Latrobe and Jeannette, Pa. Latrobe pays $10 to quarterback John Brallier for expenses.

1934 — The Chicago Bears and the College All-Stars played to a 0-0 tie before 79,432 in the first game of this series.

1950 — Brooklyn's Gil Hodges ties a major league record by hitting Boston Brave pitching for four homers in the Dodgers' 19-3 rout. Hodges also added a single for 17 total bases.

1955 — Nashua, ridden by Eddie Arcaro, goes wire-to-wire to defeat Swaps, ridden by Bill Shoemaker in a match race at Washington Park. Nashua's victory avenges his second-place finish, behind Swaps, in the 1955 Kentucky Derby.

1959 — Australia beats the defending champion United States 3-2 to take the Davis Cup.

1970 — The United States sweeps West Germany 5-0 to capture the Davis Cup.

1984 — Pinklon Thomas wins a 12-round decision over Tim Witherspoon in Las Vegas to win the WBC heavyweight title.

1985 — Prakas, driven by Bill O'Donnell, sets a trotting mile record with a clocking of 1:53 2-5 at Du Quoin, Ill.

1985 — Angel Cordero Jr., 42, becomes the third rider in history behind Bill Shoemaker and Laffit Pincay Jr. to have his mounts earn $100 million, while riding at Belmont Park.

1991 — Houston quarterback David Klingler sets an NCAA record with six touchdown passes in the second quarter as the Cougars pound Louisiana Tech 73-3.

1996 — Oklahoma State becomes the first Division I-A team to win a regular-season overtime game, avoiding an embarrassing loss to Division I-AA Southwest Missouri State, when David Thompson's 13-yard touchdown run gives the Cowboys a 23-20 win.

1997 — Eddie George rushes for 216 yards, the second best opening-day NFL performance, in helping Tennessee past Oakland 24-21 in overtime.

1999 — The U.S. Open loses two-time defending champion Patrick Rafter because of injury. Rafter, bothered by a right shoulder injury, retires after Cedric Pioline broke his serve in the opening game of the fifth set. It's the first time a defending champion — man or woman — loses in the first round in the history of this Grand Slam tournament going back to 1881.

2001 — Pitcher Danny Almonte who dominated the Little League World Series with his 70 mph fastballs is ruled ineligible after government records experts determine he actually is 14, and that birth certificates showing he was two years younger are false. The finding nullifies all the victories by his Bronx, N.Y., team, the Rolando Paulino Little League All-Stars.

2004 — Omar Vizquel is 6-for-7 to tie the American League record for hits for a nine-inning game in Cleveland's 22-0 victory over the New York Yankees. The 22-0 beating, is the largest loss in the history of the Yankees' organization.

2007 — Jeremy Wariner leads an American sweep of the medals in the 400 meters at the track and field world championships. Wariner wins in a personal best 43.45 seconds, with LaShawn Merritt taking silver and Angelo Taylor getting bronze. It's the first medal sweep for any country in the men's 400 at the world championships.

2010 — BYU announces it's leaving the Mountain West Conference and will go independent in football while joining the West Coast Conference in all other sports in the 2011-2012 school year.

Sept. 1

1923 — The United States wins its fourth consecutive Davis Cup by beating Australia four matches to one.

1946 — Patty Berg wins the U.S. Women's Open golf title by beating Betty Jameson in the final round.

1973 — George Foreman knocks out Jose Roman at 2:00 of the first round in Tokyo to retain the heavyweight title.

1975 — Tom Seaver strikes out Manny Sanguillen in the seventh inning to become the first pitcher to strike out 200 or more batters in eight consecutive seasons. Seaver records 10 strikeouts in the Mets' 3-0 triumph over Pittsburgh.

1984 — Willie Totten of Mississippi Valley State passes for a Division I-AA record 536 yards and nine touchdowns in a 86-0 rout of Kentucky State. Jerry Rice catches 17 passes for 294 yards and five touchdowns and breaks his own Division I-AA record for receiving yards.

1989 — Chris Evert becomes the first 100-match winner in 108 years of U.S. tennis championships. Evert, playing her final U.S. Open, beat Patricia Tarabini 6-2, 6-4.

1996 — Kenya's Daniel Komen lowers the world record in the 3,000 meters by more than four seconds in the Rieti Grand Prix II. Komen, who set the two-mile record in July, finishes in 7 minutes, 20.67 seconds, breaking the mark of 7:25.11 set by Noureddine Morceli in 1994.

1998 — Mark McGwire breaks Hack Wilson's 68-year-old National League record for home runs in a season, hitting his 56th and 57th in the St. Louis Cardinals' victory over the Florida Marlins.

2001 — Iowa's Aaron Greving ties an NCAA record by scoring touchdowns on three consecutive carries in a 51-0 victory over Kent State.

2007 — Appalachian State 34, No. 5 Michigan 32. Julian Rauch's 24-yard field goal with 26 seconds left puts the Mountaineers ahead of the Wolverines and Corey Lynch blocks a field goal in the final seconds to seal one of college football's biggest upsets.

2007 — Clay Buchholz throws a no-hitter in his second major league start, just hours after being called up by the Boston Red Sox. Buchholz strikes out nine, walks three and hits one batter to give the Red Sox a 10-0 victory over Baltimore.

2010 — Victoria Azarenka, seeded 10th, pauses about a half-hour into her second-round match at the U.S. Open, then staggers, stumbles and collapses to the court. She retires from the match. Tests show she has a mild concussion after banging her head in the gym while warming up before the match.

2010 — The Big Ten announces its divisional breakdown for football when the league expands to 12 members in 2011. The six-team division break down is: Michigan, Nebraska, Iowa, Michigan State, Minnesota and Northwestern in one; Ohio State, Penn State, Wisconsin, Illinois, Purdue and Indiana in the other.

Sept. 2

1908 — Tommy Burns knocks out Bill Lang in the sixth round in Melbourne for his last successful defense of his heavyweight title.

1940 — Byron Nelson wins the PGA by beating Sam Snead 1-up at the Hershey Country Club in Pennsylvania.

1945 — Frank Parker wins the men's singles title in the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships by beating Bill Talbert. Sarah Palfrey Cooke beats Pauline Betz for the women's title.

1984 — Phil Simms passes for 409 yards, including 306 in the first half, and four touchdowns to lead the New York Giants to a 28-27 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles.

1984 — In his first NFL start, Atlanta's Gerald Riggs rushes for 202 yards and scores two touchdowns as the Falcons beat New Orleans 36-28.

1995 — Frank Bruno wins a heavyweight championship in his fourth attempt registering a unanimous decision over Oliver McCall to take his WBC title in Wembley, England.

2000 — Tennessee wins its 700th football game with a 19-16 win over Southern Mississippi.

2001 — Michael Schumacher becomes the winningest driver in Formula One history, winning the Belgian Grand Prix for his 52nd career victory. Schumacher breaks the mark shared with Alain Prost and clinches his fourth world championship.

2003 — Eric Gagne sets a major league record with his 55th consecutive save in Los Angeles's 4-1 victory over Houston.

2007 — Allyson Felix becomes the second woman to win three gold medals at a single world championships meet, helping the United States to victory in the 4x400-meter relay. U.S. teammate Bernard Lagat gets a double for doing something no one had ever done at the track and field world championships. Lagat becomes the first 1,500-5,000 double winner in world championship history, biding his time in the 5,000 meters before kicking for home.

2010 — Seattle Storm forward Lauren Jackson is selected the WNBA's most valuable player for the third time in her career. Jackson, a 6-foot-5 forward from Australia, averaged 20.5 points and 8.3 rebounds while helping the Storm to a 28-6 record — tying the league mark for the most wins in a season.

Sept. 3

1921 — The United States defeats Japan in five straight matches to win the Davis Cup.

1932 — Ellsworth Vines wins the men's singles title in the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships with a three-set victory over France's Henri Cochet.

1944 — Frank Parker wins the men's singles title with a four-set victory over Bill Talbert in the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championships. Pauline Betz captures her third straight women's title with 6-3, 8-6 victory over Margaret Osborne.

1956 — Jockey John Longden surpasses Sir Gordon Richards' then-record number of wins by riding Arrogate to victory in the Del Mar Handicap at Del Mar Racetrack to attain his 4,871st victory.

1994 — Terry Dean of Florida tosses an NCAA record-tying seven TD passes in the first half of the Gators' 70-21 victory over New Mexico State.

1994 — Miami beats Georgia Southern 56-0, breaking an NCAA record with its 58th consecutive home victory. The Hurricanes surpass Alabama's record of 57 wins in a row at home set from 1962-82.

1995 — The Carolina Panthers lose to the Atlanta Falcons 23-20 in their first NFL game and the Jacksonville Jaguars lose their first game to the Houston Oilers 10-3.

2000 — Duce Staley rushes for 201 yards and a touchdown to lead the Philadelphia Eagles to a 41-14 rout of the Dallas Cowboys. Staley is the Eagles' first 200-yard runner since Steve Van Buren in 1949.

2006 — Annika Sorenstam ties the LPGA record for the lowest final-round score by a tournament winner with a 62. Down five strokes at the start of play, Sorenstam shoots 10 under for the day to finish 19 under, two strokes ahead of Cristie Kerr in the State Farm Classic.

2006 — Spain beats Greece 70-47 to win its first men's world basketball championship. Greece (8-1) advanced to its first final after a 101-95 semifinal win over the United States.

2007 — Pedro Martinez completes his comeback from major shoulder surgery, becoming the 15th pitcher to strike out 3,000 batters in his career. The New York Mets' right-hander fans Aaron Harang for the milestone as the Mets post a 10-4 win over Cincinnati.

2010 — Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger has his suspension cut from six games to four by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, allowing him to return Oct. 17 against Cleveland.

2010 — The NHL signs off on Ilya Kovalchuk's latest contract with the New Jersey Devils, five weeks after rejecting the Russian's 17-year, $102 million deal because it violated the league's salary cap. The league approves a revised 15-year, $100 million deal after reaching an agreement with the players association on an amendment covering long-term contracts.

End Adv

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