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Outdoor notes

Published: Thursday, July 2 2015 2:53 a.m. MDT

A file photo of a 22-year old buffalo at his new home on Fremont Island. The 24th annual Bison Roundup and Range Ride will be Oct. 29-30. (Michael Brandy, Deseret News archives) A file photo of a 22-year old buffalo at his new home on Fremont Island. The 24th annual Bison Roundup and Range Ride will be Oct. 29-30. (Michael Brandy, Deseret News archives)

FLY-FISHING CHALLENGE

The second annual Utah Fly-Fishing Challenge, benefitting the National Ability Center, will be held Friday and Saturday, with Victory Ranch east of Park City hosting the climactic fish-off final featuring the top six teams.

The Challenge offers two days of friendly competition hosted at River's Edge at Deer Park Resort. The event begins with a casting competition for each team and the public on Friday at 3:30 p.m., followed by an evening festival featuring two bands, family activities, a barbecue dinner and official "Beat Draw," where teams' fishing positions will be determined by a blind, random draw.

On Saturday, a maximum of 40 two-person teams will compete in a full day of fishing. Only one angler fishes at a time, and a judge will score the largest fish from each individual angler. The team with the highest cumulative total will win the competition. The grand prize is a rod and reel set.

Fermin Mendoza fly fishes, May 27, 2010. (Brian Nicholson, El Observador de Utah) Fermin Mendoza fly fishes, May 27, 2010. (Brian Nicholson, El Observador de Utah)

Prizes will be awarded on Saturday at 6 p.m., and the public is encouraged to join in the activities which include food and entertainment. At 6:30 p.m., there will be an opportunity drawing with a grand prize of a 16.5-foot Hyde Pro Series hybrid drift boat valued at $8,500. First prize is an NRS Gigbob, and second prize is a Titan rod vault. Drawing tickets are available for a suggested donation of $20 and are available at Jans Mountain Recreation Experts and the National Ability Center.

Entry fee is $300 per team, and all proceeds benefit the National Ability Center.

OHV COURSE OFFERED

An off-highway vehicle (OHV) education course for youth ages 8 to 15 is available at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 9, at the Jordan River OHV State Recreation Area.

Students must first complete the online certification class and receive the youth OHV education card before registering for the course. This three-hour training provides hands-on instruction covering correct turning postures, braking procedures, handling quick stops and swerves, riding over obstacles and traversing hills.

A parent or legal guardian must attend the class with the students, who must provide their own appropriately-sized OHV, helmet and goggles. They should wear long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, gloves and over-the-ankle boots.

Classes are free, but pre-registration is required by calling 1-800-OHV-RIDE.

BISON ROUNDUP RANGE RIDE

SYRACUSE — Antelope Island State Park hosts the 24th annual Bison Roundup and Range Ride on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 29-30, and horsemen and women interested in participating in the range ride must register by Friday, Oct. 22.

All registration documents are available online at stateparks.utah.gov.

Range ride participants will herd the Antelope Island bison to designated areas that weekend. In past years, most bison have been moved to holding facilities on the first day of the range ride. Registration fee is $25 per person and includes a souvenir bandana and entertainment.

For more information, visit stateparks.utah.gov or call 801-773-2941.

DUCK HUNT STARTS EARLY

Hunters in five counties will get a 30-minute head start when Utah's duck and goose hunt opens Saturday, Oct. 2.

The Utah Wildlife Board approved a 7:30 a.m. start time in Box Elder, Cache, Davis, Salt Lake and Weber counties. Over the past 16 years, the hunt in those counties has started at 8 a.m. Across the rest of the state, the Oct. 2 opener will start even sooner — at 6:55 a.m.

Tom Aldrich, migratory game bird coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources, says starting the hunt sooner should make opening day better for those in the marsh.

"You should have more chances to take ducks coming into your decoys," Aldrich says. "By the time 8 a.m. arrives, some of your best chances have passed.

"There's plenty of daylight at 7:30 a.m. And, after 16 years of opening the hunt at 8 a.m., we're comfortable allowing hunters to start 30 minutes earlier."

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