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FILE— A Highland man convicted of fraud will serve an extra year in prison after forging a doctor's note and submitting it to a judge in an attempt to postpone his sentence.

SALT LAKE CITY — A Highland man convicted of fraud will serve an extra year in prison after forging a doctor's note and submitting it to a judge in an attempt to postpone his sentence.

Jason Taylor, 42, pleaded guilty to contempt of court in federal court, the U.S. District Attorney's Office said Thursday.

Taylor was set to go to prison Jan. 27 for separate diet pill and personal coaching schemes after U.S. District Judge David Sam postponed his sentence until after the winter holidays.

But Taylor was arrested Jan. 18, a week after his attorney submitted the fake letter. The court said he had violated terms of his release period after discovering that the letter was fake.

He admitted Tuesday that he created a letter that appeared to come from a real doctor identified in court documents as "Dr. R.R.," and included the doctor's address and phone number.

The note said Taylor's prison term needed to be postponed indefinitely because he had a heart condition and needed multiple surgeries, according to a news release from U.S. District Attorney John Huber.

In November, he was convicted of billing $38 from each of 90,000 people's credit cards for diet pills they never ordered, and for charging $70 apiece from 48,000 credit cards for fake "online coaching."

He pleaded guilty to access device fraud and making a false statement to a bank and was ordered to serve 40 months in federal prison, plus 60 months of supervised release. He was also ordered to "forfeit almost $600,000 in proceeds from his criminal conduct," Huber said.

U.S. District Judge Lee Benson on Tuesday ordered Taylor to serve an additional 12 months in federal prison for the forged letter. The sentence was ordered to be served consecutive to his other sentence.

"His blatant dishonesty cost him one more year in federal prison,” Huber said.