SALT LAKE CITY — Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, told state lawmakers Monday that the Utah Constitution is guiding her policymaking efforts in Congress.

During her annual address to the Utah Legislature, the 4th District representative touted legislation she has introduced that would limit bills in Congress to "one subject at a time," just as Utah lawmakers already must do.

“It’s time to bring Utah to Washington and bring the common, simple way of just putting legislation on the table so the American people can make a choice or decision where they stand on these bills,” she told the Utah Senate.

In the Utah House, Love thanked lawmakers for a "good, common-sense" approach to legislation while acknowledging it will be a tough sell in Congress to end the practice of cramming a number of unrelated issues into a single bill.

"It takes a lot of courage to do what you do. It takes a lot of courage to be able to stand on your own and make something happen. I admire you. I use you as an example," she said. "You have been an example to me."

Love said she is also a champion for members of the nation’s armed services.

“I think it's important we keep the promises we made to our men and women in uniform,” she said.

Love said she has introduced legislation intended to keep promises made to their families "when they don't come back."

The first-term congresswoman said the topics she deals with as a member of the House Financial Services Committee can sometimes be "wonky," but they are important to Utah's charter banks and other financial institutions.

Love said she devotes considerable time to studying the matters before the committee and the work of the House in general.

“It was important to me to be, instead of a show pony, a workhorse,” she said.

But Love also said she makes the time to stay close to her young family in Utah.

In response to a question by Senate Minority Caucus Manger Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, regarding the personal sacrifice of parents with young children serving in Congress, Love said she flies home every weekend and ends each day talking to her children by Skype or FaceTime.

“We talk about the day and it pretty much puts things in perspective and makes sure I know where my priorities are. That moment for my children, made possible with modern technology, is incredibly important," Love said.

"I come home every weekend also, so there’s a lot of flight miles put on my account. It’s important for me to come home and remember who I work for and make sure I do everything I can to stay in touch with the people in my district," she said.

Email: lisa@deseretnews.com

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