Quantcast

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Gone With the Wind’ and more on big screen

Published: Thursday, Aug. 28 2014 3:20 p.m. MDT

Bill Murray, left, Harold Ramis and Dan Aykroyd in "Ghostbusters," which is being revived in Cinemark Theaters for its 30th anniversary.

Columbia Pictures

Who ya gonna call? “Ghostbusters”? Rhett Butler? John Wayne? Jerry Lewis?

They’ll all be on movie theater screens over the next month as new classic-movie series roll out for fall.

• “Ghostbusters” (1984, PG). Hilarious special-effects farce has the title characters (Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis, Ernie Hudson) busting Manhattan spooks until their containment units are overstuffed. Sigourney Weaver, Rick Moranis and Annie Potts co-star. (Celebrating the film’s 30th anniversary, this one runs for a full week starting today at theaters all around the state.)

• “Charley’s Aunt”/“Pay Day” (1925/1922, b/w, silent). Sydney Chaplin (Charlie’s brother) stars in this silent version of “Charley’s Aunt,” the oft-filmed farce about a college man impersonating his friend’s elderly aunt. Sydney is also in brother Charlie’s classic short “Pay Day,” in which the Little Tramp is a construction worker who slips past the missus for a night on the town. (Thursday-Friday, Sept. 4-5, The Organ Loft, 7:30 p.m., with live organ accompaniment, www.edisonstreetevents.com/silent-movies)

• “Titanic” (1953, b/w). No, this isn’t James Cameron’s film, but it’s a good drama about people onboard the ill-fated 1912 maiden voyage of the titular passenger ship. Barbara Stanwyck and Clifton Webb star, and Thelma Ritter handily steals the show as the Molly Brown character (with a different name). A very young Robert Wagner co-stars. (Tuesday, Sept. 9, 10 a.m., SCERA Center, Orem, www.scera.org/events/view/322)

• “Ramona” (1928, b/w, silent) is an exciting find for film fans, a silent movie that was thought lost until 2010 when a print was discovered in a Prague archive. It’s been restored but is not yet on video, and this marks its Utah debut. The classic tale of racial injustice starring Dolores Del Rio was filmed in Zion National Park some 86 years ago and is said to offer gorgeous visuals of the landscape. (Friday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m., free, with live organ accompaniment, BYU, Provo, http://lib.byu.edu/sites/artcomm/)

• “The Nutty Professor” (1963). Considered by fans to be Jerry Lewis’ masterpiece, this is a comic riff on “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” as a nerdy college professor invents a potion that turns him into a slick womanizer. Stella Stevens co-stars. Some funny sight gags. (Sunday, Sept. 14, 2 p.m., and Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2 and 7 p.m., Cinemark Theatres, www.cinemark.com/cinemark-classic-series)

• “North to Alaska” (1960). John Wayne stars in this rowdy and amusing Klondike comedy. He has an Alaskan gold claim with his partner (Stewart Granger), a claim which con artist Ernie Kovacs is determined to steal, and there are romantic mix-ups involving Capucine and Fabian. Nice location photography, even if it is actually California. (Tuesday, Sept. 16, 10 a.m., SCERA Center, Orem, www.scera.org/events/view/322)

• “Black Cyclone” (1925, b/w, silent) is a Western that includes title cards for the thoughts of the two top-billed stars — Rex the Wonder Horse and Lady the Horse. Guinn “Big Boy” Williams, with third billing, is the human star. A novelty, to be sure. (Friday-Saturday, Sept. 18-19, The Organ Loft, 7:30 p.m., with live organ accompaniment, www.edisonstreetevents.com/silent-movies)

• “Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” (1964, b/w). Classic anti-nuclear-war satire from Stanley Kubrick, with Peter Sellers in three very different roles (including the U.S. president and the title character, who can’t control his Nazi salute), George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden and Slim Pickens. Hysterically funny and full of memorable set pieces. (Sunday, Sept. 21, 2 p.m., and Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2 and 7 p.m., Cinemark Theatres, www.cinemark.com/cinemark-classic-series)

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS