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Book review: ‘In Plain Sight’ has interesting premise, but is rather plain

By Elizabeth Reid

For the Deseret News

Published: Saturday, Aug. 16 2014 5:00 a.m. MDT

"IN PLAIN SIGHT," by Clair M. Poulson, Covenant Communications, $16.99, 234 pages (f)

Donte Noble is on the run. Accused of murdering his ex-fiancée’s brother and unable to prove his innocence, Donte hides in plain sight by posing as a wandering homeless man. While trekking through Nevada, he is picked up by popular mystery writer Clive Granger. The two become friends and Clive embarks to prove Donte’s innocence.

While Donte continues his nomadic lifestyle, Clive journeys to Utah and becomes acquainted with, and attracted to, Donte’s sister. As the duo attempt to unravel the mystery surrounding the accusations against Donte, they find themselves wondering who to trust and just how close they are to the actual murderer.

Meanwhile, Donte comes across two attractive damsels in distress. Most young females would be wary of striking up a friendship with a disheveled, foul-smelling man. However, Chey Beckett not only instantly likes Donte, but she trusts him enough to ask him on a date and invite him into her hotel room to check on her ill friend. When Donte reveals he has medical training and asks if he can give the ill woman an LDS priesthood blessing, Chey’s trust in this stranger seems justified.

The plot thickens to include a lazy police detective, a suspicious private investigator and a missing witness while integrating two love stories. While the actual murderer isn’t revealed until the very end, and is a great surprise, the slow pacing of the story makes the final revelation a relief, instead of a climax.

Author Clair Poulson has written several novels, but his dialog in this book is stilted and unrealistic. The plot idea is great, but various unneeded paragraphs of minutae explanation make the novel drag. This book is an easy read, but it is also easy to put down.

“In Plain Sight” has no offensive language, very little violence and the romance doesn’t go beyond hand-holding and hugging. Most of the main characters belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and strive to live its teachings.

Poulson has decades of experience in the criminal justice system. He and his wife are the parents of five children and live in Duchesne.

Elizabeth Reid has bachelor's degrees in economics and history. She has worked in retail, medical billing, catering, education and business fields. Her favorite occupation is that of wife and mother. She blogs at gelatoandchocolate.blogspot.com.

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