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How this potato salad can help you save money on groceries

Published: Monday, July 7 2014 10:39 p.m. MDT

Think you're spending too much on groceries? Here's how to spend less, inspired by one man's passion for potato salad.

PR Newswire

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Americans spend less than any other country on food, and this may be why — their entrepreneurial spirit.

Zack “Danger” Brown from Columbus, Ohio recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise money to make potato salad for the first time.

“I’ve always enjoyed potato salad at Memorial Day parties and Labor Day parties," Brown told BuzzFeed. "Early this week someone asked if I’d ever made potato salad and I couldn’t say that I had. So I turned to Kickstarter to change that.”

Even though Brown wasn't raising the money to feed children or relieve himself of longtime debts, he may have just changed the way some families fund their meals.

His initial request to cook up the July 4 staple? Just $10.

But things took off from there.

Not only did Brown meet his goal, but he steamrolled past the rest of them. His goals for $35, $75 and $100 for ingredients were just mere steps on his way to the whopping $23,649 he earned as of this writing.

“More money would come flowing in and with it more goals,” wrote Andrew Roberts for UPROXX. “It seems people just couldn’t get enough of this guy and his dream of the perfect potato salad. Hats were pitched, better mayonnaise was pledged."

For reaching his goals, he offered to make four times the amount of potato salad, try two different recipes, and send hats to his top contributos.

The grand prize for raising $3,000 (which he has now surpassed)? A party for the Internet.

“I will rent out a party hall and invite the whole Internet to the potato salad party (only $10 and above will be allowed in the kitchen)," Brown said on his Kickstarter page. "The Internet loves potato salad! Let's show them that potato salad loves the Internet!”

Just imagine what could be done if some of that money (or potato salad) was given to the poorest Americans, who spend more on food than the wealthy do, especially now that new studies reveal an increasing amount of Americans believe poverty is caused by circumstances outside of people's control.

Email: hscribner@deseretdigital.com, Twitter: @herbscribner

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