Deseret News National Edition: Video games and PTSD, the Ulster project and wage theft

Published: Sunday, June 29 2014 9:30 a.m. MDT

This week’s Deseret News National Edition looks at how video game technology is helping veterans battle PTSD, discusses how the Ulster Project is uniting youths and visits the set of a movie based on the bombing at Cokeville Elementary School.

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This week’s Deseret News National Edition looks at how video game technology is helping veterans battle PTSD, discusses how the Ulster Project is uniting youths in Northern Ireland and visits the set of a movie based on the bombing at Cokeville Elementary.

Segment 1

This month, surviving World War II and Korean veterans from around the country have embarked on a special tour of honor. They were given a free trip to Washington, D.C., by the Honor Flight network to see the memorials dedicated to their service. Jed Boal takes us on the emotional journey with a group of veterans from Utah.

No doubt war leaves many veterans emotionally scarred for life. At least 20 percent of those who return suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. The military has worked closely with USC's Institute for Creative Technologies to develop innovative strategies for treating PTSD using video game technology. As Candice Madsen discovered, the man leading the program has personal reasons for wanting to help veterans that stem from his childhood.

Segment 2

An international program is helping to break down barriers and leave friendships in their place. Catholics and Protestants in the United States work together to host teenagers from Northern Ireland in their homes. They give them an opportunity to meet young people here and from their own community. They believe the understanding will lead to peace in their homeland.

It's called the Ulster Project. Dave McCann visited with participants in the program.

Segment 3

There are thieves stealing billions of dollars in America who are not robbers targeting convenience stores or banks. They are not thugs pointing guns and grabbing cash at gas stations. The billions stolen are part of "wage theft," and the culprits in the workplace are employers, not employees. Moneywise reporter Michael De Groote explains the crime and how to stop it.

A true story about faith, hope and unexplained miracles is in production. It's based on a true story that happened in Cokeville, Wyoming. Keith McCord visited the set recently and discovered how making the movie created healing.

The Deseret News National Edition highlights Deseret News content centered around six areas of editorial emphasis: family, faith in the community, excellence in education, values in media and culture and causes related to helping the poor and financial responsibility. Each week, the program goes in-depth on these topics and brings insights from voices from around the country.

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