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Picturing history: Algernon Sidney Gilbert farm

Published: Wednesday, June 11 2014 5:00 a.m. MDT

On June 24, 1834, the members of Zions Camp moved to the home of Algernon Sidney Gilbert on the banks of Rush Creek in Clay County, Missouri. That day, some members of the camp started feeling ill due to the effects of cholera. John Carter was the first of the group to die as a result of the disease. Thirteen camp members and two others succumbed to vicious symptoms.

Kenneth Mays

On June 24, 1834, following a violent storm near Fishing River, several days rest on the John Cooper farm and the reception of Section 105 of the Doctrine and Covenants, the members of Zion’s Camp moved to the home of Algernon Sidney Gilbert on the banks of Rush Creek in Clay County, Missouri.

That day, some members of the camp started feeling ill due to the effects of cholera. John Carter was the first of the group to die as a result of the disease. Thirteen camp members and two others succumbed to vicious symptoms. Many others, including Joseph Smith, were extremely ill but did not die.

It has been suggested that the fear of cholera may have been a factor with regard to the mobs not following through on their threats to attack Zion’s Camp — they chose, instead, to stay as far away as possible.

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