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Germans continue to show morality concerns over Holocaust, The Atlantic says

Published: Monday, Feb. 3 2014 9:40 a.m. MST

Extermination camp in Auschwitz Birkenau is pictured here. A recent article by The Atlantic looked at whether today’s Germans should feel morally responsible for the Holocaust.

Assawin, Getty Images/iStockphoto

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A recent article by The Atlantic looked at whether today’s Germans should feel morally responsible for the Holocaust. Writer Emma Green looked at Yascha Mounk’s new book, “Stranger in My Own Country: A Jewish Family in Modern Germany,” which examined how Jewish people have lived in Germany over the past 70 years. This prodded Green to look into how Germans of today deal with events from the past.

“How is it that young people come to feel guilty about the sins of their parents and grandparents?” wrote Green. “How did today’s twenty-something Germans learn to internalize guilt about Auschwitz, maybe even coming to resent the assumption that they’re supposed to feel guilty at all? How do atrocious ethnic crimes become disembodied ideas, morphing into a vague sense of moral responsibility?”

Read the full article at TheAtlantic.com.

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