Tips for living: Sisters share family history tips, experiences in 'Climbing Family Trees'

By Rosemarie Howard

For the Deseret News

Published: Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013 5:15 a.m. MDT

Mentioning the topics of family history or genealogy brings a variety of responses ranging from “What’s that?” to “It’s what I live for." Most members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are aware of the mandate to seek out their kindred dead, but many find the idea of doing genealogy a bit intimidating or even uninteresting.

“Climbing Family Trees” (Big World Newtwork, $6.99) by Trina Boice and Tracey Long is for anyone who has any interest at all in family history. A sample of chapter titles reflects their enthusiastic, fun approach to the topic: “Grab on to a Branch,” Get a Leg Up,” Turn Over a New Leaf,” Going Out on a Limb and Avoiding False Footings,” and “Barking Up the Right Tree.”

Inspiring stories, Web and book resources, unusual epitaphs and statements from death certificates such as “Went to bed and woke up dead” are sprinkled liberally throughout the book. There is even some poetry. Each chapter ends with an assignment to apply the ideas presented.

Here are just a few of the suggestions they offer to involve the living in family history activities.

Create a family time capsule to be opened 25 years from when it is created.

Talk to your living relatives repeatedly about their lives and what they remember about deceased family members.

Build or create a special trunk where famly history items can be stored.

Collect favorite family recipes to create a unique family recipe book.

Watch a movie about a country one of your ancestors came from.

Watch one of the TV miniseries on finding family history, like “Roots,” "Who Do You Think You Are?" or "The Generations Project," as a family and let it inspire you to find your roots and branches.

The authors, twin sisters, are both members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Both are writers and are co-hosts for Roots Television.

Rosemarie Howard lives in a 100-year-old house on Main Street, Springville. She enjoys creating multimedia projects. Her website is at dramaticdimensions.com.

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