Quantcast

Utah football: Utes head coach Kyle Whittingham full Week 2 press conference transcript (+video, audio)

Published: Tuesday, Sept. 3 2013 12:10 a.m. MDT

Kyle Whittingham week two press conference

That's part of college football, and coaching is obviously halftime adjustments. A lot of games are won or lost based on halftime adjustments. I thought our guys did a nice job at halftime.

Reporter: Were you at all concerned with the missed opportunities at bringing down Chuckie Keeton in the backfield, or do you just attribute that to how good of a player he is?

KW: Both. He's a tremendous player, and he's very difficult to sack. We had him, I don't know how many times, back there in the backfield, and he'd break two, three, sometimes four tackles or make people miss. Great players do that, and he's a great player. The great players bring a whole bag of minuses to the game, and they hand them out to defenders as the play goes on.

Reporter: Coach, do you look at the running backs as a running back by committee type thing now, with (James) "Bubba" Poole upgraded to a co-starter with Kelvin York? I know you don't talk about injuries, but do you expect Kelvin to be ready to go this week?

KW: "Bubba" and Kelvin are 1 and 1-A as we mentioned last week, and they're both on equal footing. They really both bring a different skill set to the table. Karl Williams is not far behind the other two. I mean, he's got his role as well. We think he's a good addition to those two guys. Then Lucky Radley, who you didn't get to see much of at all in the game on Thursday, is still a guy that we think can help us out.

Reporter: Do you use the Eastern Washington upset and games like that as a motivation so the team doesn't look past Weber State?

KW: Without a doubt. We'll address that in the team meeting today. I think, if our count is correct, that there were eight teams in Division 1 that got beat by FCS teams.

Reporter: Other than just not having a letdown this week and getting another win, is there something you're hoping to accomplish this week in the Weber State game?

KW: Well, yeah. As I mentioned, the things that we were not good at in the Utah State game. … Football coaches, they study film and they look for weaknesses, and if you can't handle the blitz or hit movement on your offensive line or cover a fade with your corners, they're going to try to exploit everything that we didn't do very well. We've got to get that addressed, or else you're going to keep seeing it week after week, and that's the nature of coaching. You see a soft spot in their PAT field goal protection, you're going to go right at it.

The main objective this week, like I said, is to shore up those areas of weakness that we had in the Utah State game.

Reporter: You talked a lot about stepping up the tempo of the offense. Were you satisfied with the tempo?

KW: Very much so. I think tempo's overrated. I hear so much about tempo, it's starting to be a little irritating. If my information is correct, there were 10 teams in Division 1 football that snapped it 88 times or more this past weekend, and seven of those teams lost. There's a point of diminishing returns for tempo.

It's not about tempo. It's about execution and the players that are playing for you. Tempo is all fine and dandy, but like I said, there's a point where if you start to go too fast, I think it has a negative effect. I think we snapped it about 74, 75 times, which is just about right as far as I'm concerned.

Reporter: Coach, with Kenneth Scott's injury, who are you really looking at to step up into the hole that he leaves.

KW: It's got to be Anthony Denham and Sean Fitzgerald, the two guys that really stepped up in the game on Thursday, and in addition, we've got to get the tight ends more involved. Jake Murphy and Westlee Tonga are two of our best playmakers, and as coaches, I think we need to do a better job featuring those guys, get them the ball more and make them more impactful to the game. The combination of those two things: the receivers that were behind Kenneth, and get the tight ends more involved.

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS