Ray Grass: The great outdoors: For hot fishing, pick the cooler hours

Published: Tuesday, Aug. 6 2013 9:34 a.m. MDT

Along with the mystery of when a fish will bite is the question of which fish will it be. These days it could be a rainbow or the newly introduced tiger trout.

The tiger trout is the offspring of a male brown trout and female brook trout. The combination produces a trout with a maze-like pattern of colors similar to a tiger’s. It is rapidly becoming one of the more popular fish in Utah. There are more than 40 waters in Utah stocked with tiger trout, which includes several waters in the Uintas.

The most abundant fish remains the rainbow trout.

Ted Hallows, manager of the DWR’s Kamas Hatchery, says that the tiger trout has turned the Uinta lakes “into a two-tier fishery. Fishermen can fish all day with PowerBait (for rainbow), but the tiger is more of a predator so will go after flies and lures in the mornings and evenings.’’

Another advantage to fishing the high country is that during those slow times it’s not hard to stay busy with such activities as picnics, hikes, scenic drives, identifying flora and fauna, searching for wildlife or lounging around and drinking in the incredible landscape.

Tips:

• The Uintas are good start because there are a number of roadside lakes frequently planted, like Mirror, Teapot, Lost, Pass and Butterfly, which are easy to reach. (Lakes were stocked the week of Aug. 4.)

• Manufacturers are more aware of the younger generation than ever before. One maker offers a “no tangle’’ outfit — rod, reel and line — for a mere $15. Make sure it’s tangle free. Nothing ruins a good fishing trip like a tangle.

• Along with fish, bugs also can come out when it’s cooler. Take along repellant.

• Take along a cooler. Fresh fish make a great meal.

• Know the laws, especially where it comes to limits. Generally, the limit is four trout except on special waters. Because of the drought, the limit on some waters is eight. Check the Utah Fishing Proclamation for specific details.

• Licenses are $5 for those 12 and 13, $21 for seniors and $26 for those 14 to 65.

• The website for the DWR is www.wildlife.utah.gov. Find a current fishing and planting update, as well as the proclamation.

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