What's new: History of St. George Utah Temple detailed in 'All That Was Promised'

By Rosemarie Howard

For the Deseret News

Published: Thursday, June 27 2013 5:00 a.m. MDT

"ALL THAT WAS PROMISED: The St. George Temple and the Unfolding of the Restoration,” by Blaine M. Yorgason, Richard A. Schmutz and Douglas D. Alder, Deseret Book, $34.99, 374 pages (nf)

“All That Was Promised: The St. George Temple and the Unfolding of the Restoration,” by Blaine M. Yorgason, Richard A. Schmutz and Douglas D. Alder, tells the story of the building of the St. George Utah Temple.

Beginning with the initial call that sent established Salt Lake Valley Saints to the Cotton Mission in southern Utah in 1861, the authors detail the sacrifice and efforts of the early Mormon settlers to establish homes, gardens, communities and, ultimately, the first temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints completed in the western United States.

Drawing on many unpublished accounts provided by Jennine Vander Bruggen, president of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers McQuarrie Memorial Museum board of directors in St. George, the authors provide intimate glimpses into the personal thoughts and activities of the first settlers in Utah’s Dixie.

Using these accounts, the writers describe the building of the St. George Utah Temple from its beginning as a proposal from Brigham Young to church leaders and members to its dedication in 1877 and to its current condition.

Two sections of black and white photos, taken in the late 1800s through the mid-1970s, provide a visual reference to the people, buildings and land described in the text. An index and an appendix listing the original pioneer settlers of St. George from 1861 to 1869 are included.

The book contains a wealth of information and is a valuable resource and contribution to the history of LDS temple building.

All three authors have proven academic backgrounds in writing and history, along with strong ties to St. George and the temple there. All three men are currently serving with their wives as workers in the St. George Utah Temple.

Rosemarie Howard lives in a 100-year-old house on Main Street, Springville. She enjoys creating multimedia projects. Her website is at dramaticdimensions.com.

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