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New one-of-a-kind printer aims to aid health care process

Published: Wednesday, June 19 2013 5:05 p.m. MDT

Rod Memmott checks a sheet that was printed on the Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106 printing press at KP Corporation in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, June 19, 2013.

Laura Seitz, Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — A new, high-tech printer seeks to help make Utah’s medical device and life sciences sectors among the most technologically advanced in the nation.

KP Corp. recently invested $4 million in the renovation of its existing facility in Salt Lake City to become a state-of-the-art print supply chain service center.

On Wednesday, the company unveiled the latest in high-tech printing technology to support those and other tech-based industries. The one-of-a-kind, 66-ton press features digital cameras that conduct automated inspections of each individual page to ensure 100 percent accuracy, explained Tyler O’Toole, KP Corp. operations manager.

The cameras take a picture of everything on the printed sheet and compare it to client-approved files at speeds of more than 30,000 images per hour, O’Toole said. The machine validates the content’s correctness, finds any imperfections and immediately rejects them, reducing a life science company’s liability and helping it meet strict government regulations, he added.

“So if we’re missing text or even one period, it can cause regulatory issues,” O’Toole explained. “What we do is confirm that every single piece that comes out is 100 percent correct every single time.”

This process produces critical materials such as user and operational instructions, equipment setup and other documentation for medical device, diagnostics, biotechnology and pharmaceutical product companies, he said.

Ensuring correctness will help health care workers and patients in utilizing medical devices in the most effective manner, O’Toole said.

“How the devices are to be used, how it needs to be cleaned — all the information you would want to have” when using devices such as pacemakers or infusion pumps that supply medications intravenously, he explained.

The Heidelberg Speedmaster XL 106 printing press is located at KP Corp.’s newly remodeled facility in Salt Lake City.

Headquartered in San Leandro, Calif., KP Corp. employs 41 full-time workers in Utah and 300 people nationally in California, Washington, Utah and Texas. The company supports the heavily regulated life sciences, medical device and healthcare industries.

“The press is just one component of KP’s extensive equipment and remodeling investment, which also includes strengthened security measures, production floor upgrades, new office configurations and remodeled meeting spaces,” said KP Corp. CEO Joe Atturio. “Our renovations have created a secure, streamlined, high-tech facility that provides an unparalleled customer experience in Utah in the supply chain management industry.”

The press is the only one of its configuration available for commercial use in the U.S., Atturio said.

Established in Salt Lake City 42 years ago, the company provides a large selection of programs and specialty products for the life sciences and medical device industries, as well as other sectors such as technology and software.

Prior to the development of such highly sophisticated printing presses, O’Toole said a gap existed in the technology available to create the important instruction materials being produced.

Now, patients can feel comfortable that they are getting high-quality directions, and so can vendors and suppliers, he said.

“(Before), you would run on the press and hope that you would have it right,” O’Toole said. “With this, we are certifying that it is 100 percent correct.”

Email: jlee@deseretnews.com

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