Book review: 'Refined by Christ' compares ore refinery process with spiritual refiner's fire

By Stephanie Abney

For the Deseret News

Published: Sunday, May 26 2013 5:00 a.m. MDT

"REFINED BY CHRIST," by Toni Sorenson, Covenant Communications, $15.99, 123 pages (nf)

After reading Malachi 3:2 in the Bible, Utah author Toni Sorenson wanted to understand how the Lord could be like a refiner. She began an intense study of metallurgy. As Sorenson came to understand the process required to take a chunk of ugly ore and transform it into something precious and pure, she began to see the purpose of our personal struggles.

Drawing from the scriptures, counsel from leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, her own experiences and those of others, Sorenson has created a valuable narrative as presented in her new recent book "Refined by Christ."

Each of the nine chapters expands on some new insight she has learned. Sorenson, a Mormon convert of many years, explains why the fire has to be so hot, whether the end result is gold or the person we were meant to be. She tackles what to do when the heat is on, how to better know the refiner, Jesus Christ, and how to work through discouragement.

It is full of encouraging words for those who find themselves overwhelmed with the challenges they face. “Refined by Christ” shares journey of hope and happiness when seen through the lens Sorenson gives the reader.

Each chapter begins with a scripture verse or quote that sets the tone for what is to be learned. “Our task is to become our best selves," by LDS Church President Thomas S. Monson starts the first chapter, “A Little Better.”

Sorenson shares a deeply personal experience she had while volunteering at a leper colony in India. It is one of many examples of how she came to learn the value of the refiner’s fire.

The author freely shares her own heartaches and trials. Sorenson considers them opportunities to rid her life of impurities that would otherwise keep her from the life that Christ has purchased for her with his sacrifice. She knows that when the fire is too hot, all can call out to the refiner and he will answer.

Stephanie Abney, eternal optimist, retired schoolteacher and freelance writer, lives in Mesa, Ariz., with her husband, Jim. They have five children and 18 grandchildren. Email is sabneyfeedback@cox.net and she blogs at stephaniesaysso.blogspot.com.

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS