Quantcast

57 percent of retirees look for new jobs

Published: Friday, March 1 2013 10:10 a.m. MST

In this photo taken Aug. 1, 2012, Janice Durflinger poses for a photo at her workplace in Lincoln, Neb. Durflinger runs computer software programs for a bank. She says she still works at 76, "because I have to."

Nati Harnik, AP

Enlarge photo»

Retirement has a different meaning for 60 percent of workers older than 60.

It means looking for a new job after the initial retirement, according to a survey by CareerBuilder. Last year, 57 percent planned on finding a new job after retirement.

The good news is that 48 percent of employers plan on hiring workers older than 50 this year, which is a 4 percent rise from the 44 percent who did so in 2012. An even larger amount, 76 percent, would consider an applicant in that age range as well.

Brent Rasmussen, President of CareerBuilder North America, suggested ways mature workers can maximize a job search.

“We’re seeing more than three quarters of mature workers putting off retirement, largely due to financial concerns, but also as a personal decision made by people who enjoy their work,” Rasmussen said. “The majority of workers who have talked with their bosses about staying on past retirement found their companies to be open to retaining them. If you’re approaching retirement age but hope to continue working, an open line of communication is very important.”

Those in this age range seeking a job or planning on staying with their original job longer should also stay current by attending seminars and workshops, find new ways to benefit the company, reach out to former colleagues to network and consider part-time or freelance work, according to the survey.

EMAIL: alovell@deseretnews.com

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS