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With McCready death, anti-domestic violence coalition loses a voice

Published: Monday, Feb. 25 2013 1:25 p.m. MST

In this file photo, country singer Mindy McCready performs in Nashville, Tenn. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence is mourning the loss of what has been a powerful voice in their behalf. Country singer Mindy McCready's death, an apparent suicide, has silenced one of their most effective voices.

Associated Press

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The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence is mourning the loss of what has been a powerful voice in their behalf. Country singer Mindy McCready's death, an apparent suicide, has silenced one of their most effective voices.

"NCADV is saddened by the news of Mindy’s death, and we send condolences to her family, friends and fans,” said executive director Rita Smith in a prepared statement that was quoted this week by the Orlando Sentinel. “We worked with her after she left an abusive relationship to raise awareness about domestic violence, and she used her incredible voice to carry a message to other survivors that was a powerful call to keep struggling to get free.”

The singer's message was the song "Black and Blue," written about a previous relationship in which she was injured due to domestic violence. She talked about the violence in her relationship on Larry King Live in late 2005, explaining in part how low self-esteem played a role in sending her back even after she was abused.

In 2006, she was the features speaker at the coalition's national conference.

The singer, 37, mom to two young boys, died Sunday of what was believed to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Her boyfriend, David Wilson, died last month of what appeared also to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. That is still under investigation.

Smith noted that, “For many people who experience abuse, the effects can continue to be devastating for many years in the future.”

News articles, including one by FoxNews, have questioned whether a brain injury from domestic violence may have influenced her lethal actions. "These repeated brain injuries can lead to increased problems cognitively, physically and emotionally, which just exacerbates the vicious cycle of the violent relationship," wrote Fox's Patrick B. Donohue. "These victims typically lack the knowledge about their brain injury so they do not seek services related to their injury. Also, the professional system to help victims of domestic violence is often unaware of the correlation between this crime and traumatic brain injury. By not linking the psychodynamic issues between the assault and their brain injury, professionals are not referring these victims to appropriate rehabilitation services."

The singer's recent past has been littered with reports of problems, including a history of addiction and fierce custody battles surrounding her children.

EMAIL: lois@desnews.com, Twitter: Loisco

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