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Universities don't prepare graduates for careers without teaching teamwork, according to study

Published: Thursday, Jan. 24 2013 12:35 p.m. MST

The majority of Americans prefer to be alone, especially in the workplace. Ninety-five percent said teams serve an important function, but for the majority of those who have worked in groups, the experience has not been positive.

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Universities are not preparing students for a career unless they are learning teamwork, according to a recent study by the University of Phoenix.

The majority of Americans prefer to be alone, especially in the workplace, Bill Pepicello, president of University of Phoenix, indicated in a report after the survey. However, 95 percent of the survey's respondents said teams serve an important function.

For the majority of those who have worked in groups, the experience has not been positive, he added. Almost seven out of 10 of the employers reported that their companies have had dysfunctional units. Verbal confrontation was found to be in 40 percent of these groups.

For this reason, employers want recent graduates to have the ability to work with a team of co-workers, Pepicello said. The majority of the employers said the teamwork skill is a necessary attribute for employees.

“Employers and students should expect education to mirror the dynamics in the workplace,” said Pepicello. “Learning team projects help prepare students to be more effective in work environments that include team members with diverse skills and experience.”

EMAIL: alovell@deseretnews.com

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