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Enough signatures collected to bring West Layton Village to public vote, residents say

Published: Monday, May 21 2012 5:12 p.m. MDT

Citizens for Responsible Growth in West Layton is hoping voters will overturn actions by the Layton City Council last month that pave the way for development of West Layton Village, a 140-acre village center planned for the north and south sides of Hill Field Road between 2200 West and 2700 West. The development, patterned after the Daybreak community in South Jordan, would feature a mix of residential, commercial, office, civic and recreational uses, following standards set by the city through its new Village Center zone.

Layton City

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LAYTON — Residents opposed to plans for a Daybreak-like development in west Layton say they've gathered more than enough signatures to bring the issue to a public vote.

Brian Pead, part of the group Citizens for Responsible Growth in West Layton, said more than 6,600 signatures were collected — roughly 1,800 more than required.

The group is hoping voters will overturn actions by the Layton City Council last month that pave the way for development of West Layton Village, a 140-acre village center planned for the north and south sides of Hill Field Road between 2200 West and 2700 West.

The development, patterned after the Daybreak community in South Jordan, would feature a mix of residential, commercial, office, civic and recreational uses, following standards set by the city through its new Village Center zone.

The final batch of signatures were turned in to the Davis County clerk Monday afternoon.

"We think, with the rejected signatures and so forth, we should be in plenty of good shape," Pead said.

On April 5, the City Council approved the zone and applied it to 107 acres of farmland along Hill Field Road currently owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The group opposing the development seeks to challenge both actions by referendum.

The other 30-plus acres planned for the project already are zoned for commercial and professional use.

If county officials determine enough valid signatures have been collected, the issues would be put on the ballot — possibly in November. It would be up to Layton to determine whether there's enough time to get them on the ballot this year. If not, it would have to wait until next year, either during a special election or during the general election in November.

Jared Page

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