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Lawmakers complain Obama too aloof with Congress

By Donna Cassata

Associated Press

Published: Saturday, July 26 2014 1:24 p.m. MDT

Updated: Saturday, July 26 2014 1:24 p.m. MDT

FILE - This June 30, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama as he stands with Vice President Joe Biden during a news conference in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington. President Obama’s request for billions of dollars to deal with tens of thousands of migrant children streaming across the border set off Democrats and Republicans. Lawmakers in both parties complained that the White House, six years in , still doesn’t get it when it comes to working with Congress.

Charles Dharapak, File, Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama's request for billions of dollars to deal with migrant children streaming across the border set off Democrats and Republicans. Lawmakers in both parties complained that the White House — six years in — still doesn't get it when it comes to working with Congress.

Top GOP leaders got no notice of the $3.7 billion emergency request. The administration sent contradictory messages about what it wanted to deal with the border crisis. And as the proposal drew fierce criticism, the White House made few overtures to lawmakers in either party to rally support.

House and Senate lawmakers in both parties plus several senior congressional aides said this past week that the handling of the proposal by Obama and the White House is emblematic of the administration's rocky relationship with Congress: an ad hoc approach that shuns appeals to opponents and doesn't reward allies.

Combined with a divided Congress — GOP-led House and Democratic-controlled Senate — and election-year maneuvering, neither basic nor crisis-driven legislation is getting done.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., described the lack of communication between the White House and Congress as "stunning." He said he first learned many details of Obama's border request from news reports.

Obama is the "only person in America who can sign something into law and help bring members of his party on board for an outcome on a given piece of legislation that requires bipartisan support," McConnell said in an interview. "So it's a mystery, but that's the way they operate."

Several Democratic lawmakers echoed McConnell but spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid alienating the president of their party. They said they were baffled by the White House's tactics in handling the border request. Several Democrats expressed frustration that the president and administration officials weren't more involved in legislative fights.

Obama's hands-off approach was evident in June.

At a private White House meeting Obama held with the top four Republican and Democratic leaders in the House and Senate, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid appealed to the president to intervene in pressing McConnell to allow speedier approval of the president's dozens of ambassadorial nominees.

Obama said it was a matter for Reid and McConnell to work out, an answer that left Democrats flabbergasted, according to participants in the meeting. Finally, more than a week later, Obama called McConnell to urge him to break the logjam and get ambassadors confirmed.

McConnell said the conversation — one of the few he has had with Obama in recent months — was limited to ambassadors.

White House officials rejected the criticism, insisting that they have been regularly consulting with lawmakers.

While frustrated with the administration, Democrats also sympathized. They described Obama's untenable position of trying to work with Republicans unwilling to give him any legislative victories, especially the tea party class of 2010. The White House has argued that even if it tried to cut a deal with House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio — as it did in 2011 on entitlements, spending and taxes — there was no assurance Boehner could deliver his rambunctious caucus.

"You've got a core group of the House Republican caucus that has run on a platform of 'no compromise' — if the president's for it, they're against it," said Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md.

Several Democrats said Obama must contend with GOP animosity, but so did former President Bill Clinton, who was undeterred through two terms.

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