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Beetle marks 65th year since entry into US

By Ann M. Job

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, April 16 2014 11:42 a.m. MDT

This undated photo provided by Volkswagen shows the 2014 VW Beetle R-Line car.

Volkswagen, Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

Sixty-five years after the first Volkswagen Beetle arrived in the United States as a distinctively shaped, little car, the Beetle keeps attracting buyers with its more-spacious-than-ever, flexible interior, turbo engine power and modernized iconic look.

For 2014, the Beetle lineup gets a new, performance-oriented trim name — R-Line — with beefier bumpers and a limited-edition, bright yellow GSR model.

In addition, all Beetles now have independent rear suspension for an improved ride.

The 2014 Beetle three-door hatchback also received the top overall score of five out of five stars in federal government crash testing.

Meantime, buyers of all 2014 Beetles, even the base model, get standard Bluetooth hands-free phone connectivity; six-way adjustable front seats with lumbar adjustment; power, one-touch side windows; leather-wrapped, multi-function steering wheel, and three-color ambient interior lighting.

Starting manufacturer's suggested retail price, including destination charge, is $21,115 for a base 2014 Beetle with 170-horsepower, 2.5-liter, naturally aspirated, gasoline four cylinder and five-speed, manual transmission, according to VW's consumer website.

The lowest starting price for a 2014 Beetle with an automatic transmission is $22,215, or $1,100 more, and this is with the 170-horse five cylinder.

To get a turbocharged Beetle, buyers must move up to a diesel-fueled model that has a starting retail price of $25,415 with six-speed manual, or a gasoline turbo model with a starting retail price of $25,815 with manual, according to the VW consumer pricing website.

The lowest starting retail prices for 2014 Beetles with turbos and automatics are $26,515 with TDI diesel engine and $26,915 with gasoline turbo.

All Beetle turbos have four cylinders. All Beetles are front-wheel drive and have seats for four.

Competitors include other small, European hatchbacks, such as the 2014 Fiat 500L that has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $19,995 with 160-horsepower, turbocharged, gasoline four cylinder and six-speed manual.

Meantime, the base, 2014 Mini Cooper hardtop with 134-horsepower, turbocharged, gasoline, three-cylinder engine and six-speed manual has a starting MSRP, including destination charge, of $20,745.

Note that the 500L has seats for five people, while the Mini Cooper hardtop has seating for four.

The Beetle's first year of U.S. sales in post-World War II 1949 totaled just two cars. But popularity with young Baby Boomers swelled cumulative sales and production beyond that of the Ford Model T, to more than 15 million by the early 1970s.

In its third generation, today's Beetle posts modest numbers. Last year's U.S. sales of 43,134 were on par with U.S. sales of Fiat 500s and 2,000 shy of Mini Cooper car sales.

The 2014 Beetle, classified by the government as a compact, looks larger than expected. At 14 feet in length from bumper to bumper and nearly 6 feet wide, it's slightly longer and wider than the Fiat 500L and Mini Cooper hardtop.

The Beetle can feel surprisingly roomy inside, too, particularly in the front, where VW's supportive and well-shaped seats alleviate fatigue from long travels.

Rear-seat headroom is 37.1 inches, and front-seat headroom tops out at 39.4 inches — a tad less than the minimum 40.5 inches and 40.3 inches in the 500L and Mini Cooper hardtop, respectively. Still, all but the tallest, bulkiest passengers could find a comfortable seat in the test car.

Rear seatbacks split 50/50 and folded down easily in the test Beetle, giving flexible seating and cargo-carrying options. Maximum cargo space is 29.9 cubic feet.

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