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Sister echoes apology of man held in North Korea

By Doug Esser

Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Jan. 21 2014 12:00 a.m. MST

Terri Chung, left, and her mother, Myunghee Bae, right, look at a letter sent from their brother and son, Kenneth Bae, as they sit in Bae's home Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013, in Lynnwood, Wash. Kenneth Bae, an American tour operator and Christian missionary, has been detained in North Korea since being arrested in November, 2012, and his family is renewing calls for his release.

Ted S. Warren, Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

SEATTLE — The sister of an American missionary detained for more than a year in North Korea echoed her brother's apology to the nation for crimes he committed and his plea to the U.S. government to ramp up efforts to secure his release.

In a statement released Monday after Kenneth Bae gave a brief news conference in North Korea, Terri Chung of Edmonds, Wash., said, "We understand that Kenneth has been convicted of crimes under DPRK laws. Our family sincerely apologizes on Kenneth's behalf."

She said to North Korea's leaders: "We humbly ask for your mercy to release my brother." The family is concerned about Bae's health, and Chung said she could "see that he was distressed."

Earlier this month, Chung said Bae did nothing wrong. At the press conference that Bae said was held at his request, Bae pointed to a comment by U.S. Vice President Joe Biden last month as having made his situation more difficult.

"The vice president of United States said that I was detained here without any reason," Bae said. "And even my younger sister recently told the press that I had not committed any crime and I know that the media reported it.

"I think these comments infuriated the people here enormously. And for this reason, I am in a difficult situation now. As a result, although I was in medical treatment in the hospital for five months until now, it seems I should return to prison. And moreover there is greater difficulty in discussions about my amnesty."

Bae was arrested in November 2012 while leading a tour group and accused of crimes against the state before being sentenced to 15 years of hard labor. He was moved to a hospital last summer in poor health.

At the press conference Monday, Bae apologized and said he committed anti-government acts. He wore a gray cap and inmate's uniform with the number 103 on his chest and was under guard during the appearance. It is not unusual for prisoners in North Korea to say after their release that they spoke in similar situations under duress.

Bae spoke in Korean during the brief appearance, which was attended by The Associated Press and several other members of the foreign media in Pyongyang.

Bae, the longest-serving American detainee in North Korea in recent years, expressed hope that the U.S. government will do its best to win his release. He said he had not been treated badly in confinement.

"I believe that my problem can be solved by close cooperation and agreement between the American government and the government of this country," he said.

In her statement, Chung thanked U.S. leaders for their efforts so far, but called for an increased push to secure her brother's release.

"We implore Secretary Kerry and President Obama to take immediate action to bring Kenneth home," she said.

In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said the U.S. government was continuing to work with the Swedish Embassy on getting Bae freed.

"As we have said before, we remain very concerned about Kenneth Bae's health," Psaki said. "We continue to urge the DPRK authorities to grant Bae amnesty and immediate release."

An Obama administration official speaking on background said the U.S. government has offered to send Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues Robert King to Pyongyang to secure Bae's release and was awaiting North Korea's response.

Bae's appearance came weeks after North Korea freed an elderly American veteran of the Korean War who had been held for weeks for alleged crimes during the 1950-53 conflict.

State media said 85-year-old Merrill Newman was released because he apologized for his wrongdoing and that authorities also considered his age and medical condition. Newman said after his release that a videotaped confession was made under duress.

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