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Picturing history: Hawn's Mill and Amanda Barnes Smith

Published: Wednesday, Jan. 8 2014 5:00 a.m. MST

One of the better-known stories of LDS history is the tragedy at Hawn’s Mill, Caldwell County Missouri, on Oct. 30, 1838. At least 17 Saints were killed and 14 injured because of an assault by more than 200 armed men led by Thomas Jennings of Livingston County. Missouri scholar and BYU professor Alex Baugh has noted that the historical evidence suggests that the attack was made before the mob learned of the infamous Extermination Order of governor Lilburn W. Boggs. Amanda Barnes Smith lost her husband, Warren, and son Sardius to the gunfire of the assailants.

Kenneth Mays

One of the better-known stories from the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the tragedy at Hawns Mill, Caldwell County Missouri, on Oct. 30, 1838. At least 17 Saints were killed and 14 injured in an assault by more than 200 armed men led by Thomas Jennings of Livingston County.

Missouri scholar and BYU professor Alex Baugh has noted that the historical evidence suggests the attack was made before the mob learned of the infamous Extermination Order of Governor Lilburn W. Boggs.

Amanda Barnes Smith lost her husband, Warren, and son Sardius to the gunfire of the assailants. Another son, Alma, was seriously wounded and preserved by a remarkable series of steps taken by his mother. She is one of the many marvelous women of Latter-day Saint history and went west with the Saints. She died in 1886 and was buried at Richmond, Cache County, Utah.

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