Snapchat says it plans to make app more secure after hacker breach

By Barbara Ortutay

Associated Press

Published: Friday, Jan. 3 2014 7:12 a.m. MST

Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist with the American Civil Liberties Union, agreed.

"The main problem was that they ignored a responsible report by security researchers," he said, adding that his concern is not with the specific database of information that was released, but that Snapchat has "demonstrated a cavalier attitude about privacy and security."

Many people use Snapchat because it feels more private than other messaging apps and social networks. Users can send each other photos and videos that disappear within a few seconds after they are viewed. While the recipient can take a screenshot of the message, a big draw of Snapchat is its ephemeral nature.

"This probably won't be the last problem with Snapchat," Soghoian said. Companies like Microsoft and Google, he added, actively court security researchers and even pay bounties for people to expose flaws in their systems.

"Snapchat may be too small to pay bounties, but they certainly should be treating researchers with respect and addressing issues as soon as they are told about them," he said.

In its blog post Thursday, Snapchat listed an email address that security experts could use to contact the company "when they discover new ways to abuse our service so that we can respond quickly to address those concerns."

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