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Poll: Americans have little faith in government

By Jennifer Agiesta

Associated Press

Published: Thursday, Jan. 2 2014 6:27 a.m. MST

Even among those who say "the less government the better," 31 percent feel the nation needs a strong government to handle those complex problems.

Americans don't feel terribly optimistic about their own economic opportunities. Although 49 percent say their standard of living surpasses their parents', most are broadly pessimistic about the opportunity to achieve the American Dream. And they are mixed on whether people like them have a good chance to improve their standard of living.

Few are hopeful that the pieces are in place for the government to improve. About half are pessimistic about the country's ability to produce strong leaders generally. And 61 percent are pessimistic about the system of government overall and the way leaders are chosen.

Kathy Wooters of Houston's Kingwood community is among those who think the federal government should just get out of the way.

"We have too big of a government. I'd like it to be less in control of our lives," said Wooters, 57, a mother of four and grandmother of nine. "We are adults," she said. "We can make wise decisions with our money," rather than have the federal government dictate insurance choices and dole out more assistance to those who "want everything for free."

Wooters, a Republican and tea party supporter, said she taught her children to fend for themselves and avoid debt.

The AP-NORC Center poll was conducted online Dec. 12-16 among a random national sample of 1,141 adults. The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3.7 percentage points for all respondents.

The survey was conducted by GfK using KnowledgePanel, a probability-based Internet panel designed to be representative of the U.S. population. Respondents to the survey were first selected randomly, using phone or mail survey methods, and were later interviewed online. People selected for KnowledgePanel who didn't otherwise have access to the Internet were provided with the ability to access the Internet at no cost to them.

AP News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius contributed to this report.

Online:

AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research: http://www.apnorc.org

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