Final goodbye: Roll call of some who died in 2013

By Bernard McGhee

Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Dec. 24 2013 3:52 p.m. MST

William H. Sullivan, 90. Diplomat who oversaw the "secret war" in Laos, helped negotiate an end to U.S. military involvement in Vietnam and was the last American ambassador to Iran. Oct. 11.

Takashi Yanase, 94. Creator of one of Japan's most beloved cartoon characters, Anpanman. Oct. 13.

Hans Riegel, 90. Longtime boss of German candy maker Haribo who took the gummi bear to international fame. Oct. 15.

Ed Lauter, 74. Character actor whose long, angular face and stern bearing made him instantly recognizable in scores of movies and TV shows over five decades. Oct. 16. Mesothelioma.

Sein Win, 91. Renowned journalist in Myanmar who championed press freedom and endured three stints in prison as he chronicled several decades of his country's turbulent history. Oct. 17.

Antonia Brenner, 86. American nun who was raised in Beverly Hills and abandoned a life of privilege to live in a notorious Mexican prison. Oct. 17.

Lou Scheimer, 84. He founded the Filmation animation studio that produced Saturday morning cartoons including "Fat Albert" and "The Archie Show." Oct. 17.

Bum Phillips, 90. Folksy Texas football icon who coached the Houston Oilers during their Luv Ya Blue heyday and later led the New Orleans Saints. Oct. 18.

Tom Foley, 84. Courtly former speaker of the U.S. House who lost his seat when Republicans seized control of Congress in 1994. Oct. 18. Complications from a stroke.

Bill Young, 82. Senior Republican in the U.S. House and a defense hawk who was influential on military spending during his 43 years in Washington. Oct. 18.

William C. Lowe, 72. Former IBM executive credited with helping to bring personal computers to the masses. Oct. 19. Heart attack.

Major Owens, 77. New York City Democrat who served 12 terms in the U.S. House and helped pass the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Oct. 21. Renal failure and heart failure.

Somdet Phra Nyanasamvara, 100. Thailand's Supreme Patriarch, who headed the country's order of Buddhist monks for more than two decades. Oct. 24.

Lou Reed, 71. Punk poet of rock 'n' roll who profoundly influenced generations of musicians as leader of the Velvet Underground and remained a vital solo performer for decades after. Oct. 27.

Tadeusz Mazowiecki, 86. Eastern Europe's first democratic prime minister after communism, key adviser to Poland's Solidarity movement and U.N. human rights envoy to Bosnia. Oct. 28.

Ike Skelton, 81. He built a reputation as a military expert and social conservative during 34 years representing Missourians in the U.S. House. Oct. 28.

NOVEMBER:

Editta Sherman, 101. Photographer known as the "Duchess of Carnegie Hall" while living in a studio over the auditorium for six decades. Nov. 1.

George Magovern, 89. Pittsburgh cardiovascular surgeon who pioneered artificial heart valves. Nov. 4.

Charlie Trotter, 54. Award-winning chef and self-taught culinary master whose namesake Chicago restaurant elevated the city's cuisine and provided a training ground for top chefs. Nov. 5.

John Tavener, 69. British composer often remembered for the elegiac song performed as Princess Diana's coffin was carried out of Westminster Abbey. Nov. 12.

Glafcos Clerides, 94. Former president who guided Cyprus into the European Union and dedicated most of his 50 years in politics to trying to reunify the ethnically split island. Nov. 15.

Barbara Park, 66. Former class clown who channeled her irreverence into the million-selling mishaps of grade-schooler Junie B. Jones. Nov. 15.

Doris Lessing, 94. Nobel Prize-winning, often-polarizing author of "The Golden Notebook" and other novels that reflected her own improbable journey across the former British empire. Nov. 17.

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