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Reid: Progress made to resolve political stalemate

By Donna Cassata

Associated Press

Published: Monday, Oct. 14 2013 12:04 p.m. MDT

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2012, file photo House Minority Leader, Democrat Nancy Pelosi of California, second from left, House Speaker, Republican John Boehner of Ohio, Senate Minority Leader, Republican Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, and Senate Majority Leader, Democrat Harry Reid of Nevada, take turns speaking to reporters outside the White House in Washington after their meeting with President Barack Obama. Cs.

Jacquelyn Martin, File, Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid reported progress Monday toward a deal to avoid a threatened default and end a two-week partial government shutdown as President Barack Obama called congressional leaders to the White House to press for an end to the impasse.

"We're getting closer," Reid told reporters after he met privately with the Republican leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell.

While Reid, D-Nev., said there was not yet an accord, he said he hoped to have a proposal to outline when the two men and House leaders meet with Obama at mid-afternoon. Emerging from Reid's office, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said "he told us the negotiations were productive and positive."

No details were available on the terms under discussion.

Visiting a Washington charity, Obama mentioned the possible progress in the Senate and said his mid-afternoon meeting will determine whether it's real.

"My hope is that a spirit of cooperation will move us forward over the next few hours," the president told reporters.

Otherwise, he warned that the threat of default was legitimate.

"If we don't start making some real progress both in the House and the Senate, and if Republicans aren't willing to set aside some of their partisan concerns in order to do what's right for the country, we stand a good chance of defaulting," he said.

In announcing the meeting with Obama, the White House said the president would repeat a vow he has made consistently in recent weeks: "we will not pay a ransom for Congress reopening the government and raising the debt limit."

The two Senate leaders, Reid and McConnell, had spoken by phone Sunday but failed to agree on a deal to raise the nation's borrowing authority above the $16.7 trillion debt limit or reopen the government. Congress is racing the clock with Treasury Secretary Jack Lew warning that the U.S. will quickly exhaust its ability to pay the bills on Thursday.

Separately, a bipartisan group led by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, met for two hours Monday morning on a possible solution to the impasse.

"We're making very good progress, but there's still many details to be worked out," Collins said before joining her GOP colleagues at a meeting with McConnell. "We don't have a finished, agreed-upon product yet but I think we had an excellent meeting. And we'll get together later today."

There was no certainty that the growing anxiety among financial leaders around the world would provide the necessary jolt to Senate leaders, who represent the last, best chance for a resolution after talks between President Barack Obama and House Republican leaders collapsed.

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said Monday that investors are growing increasingly "skittish" about the possibility of default. The bond markets were closed for Columbus Day, and by mid-morning the stock market was down modestly, with both the Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index losing less than 1 percent. Trading in Asia was muted, with markets in Tokyo and Hong Kong closed for holidays.

The shutdown has furloughed 350,000 federal workers, impeded various government services, put continued operations of the federal courts in doubt and stopped the IRS from processing tax refunds. Some parks and monuments remain closed, drawing a protest at the National World War II Memorial on Sunday that included tea party-backed lawmakers who had unsuccessfully demanded defunding of Obama's 3-year-old health care law in exchange for keeping the government open.

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