Quantcast

Obama: Budget tightening could widen income gap

By Jim Kuhnhenn

Associated Press

Published: Sunday, Sept. 15 2013 11:35 a.m. MDT

In this July 14, 2011 file photo, the U.S. flag flies next to the Capitol in Washington.

Alex Brandon, Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

WASHINGTON — On the fifth anniversary of the Lehman Brothers collapse, President Barack Obama says the Republican focus on budget tightening could widen income disparities in the nation even as the economy climbs out of a debilitating recession.

Trying to lay claim to an economic turnaround, Obama acknowledged that despite progress, middle and low-income Americans have not benefited as much as the top 1 percent in the country.

"We came in, stabilized the situation," he told ABC's "This Week" in an interview broadcast Sunday. He cited 42 months in a row of growth, 7 1/2 million jobs created and a revitalized auto industry.

"The banking system works. It is giving loans to companies who can get credit. And so we have seen, I think undoubtedly, progress across the board," he said.

Obama emphasized that when it comes to a crucial deadline to raise the nation's borrowing limit next month, he would not negotiate with Republicans. They want to use the debt ceiling as leverage to cut spending further and to delay Obama's signature health care law.

After weeks devoted to the Syrian crisis, Obama is using the Lehman anniversary to put an emphasis on the economy, kicking off a series of events with a Rose Garden speech Monday. His National Economic Council is set to release a report detailing the economic advances.

Lehman's was the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history, and its demise marked the beginning of the global financial crisis and was a major catalyst of the financial meltdown.

For Obama, the anniversary is an opportunity to confront public skepticism about his stewardship of the economy and to put down his marker for budget clashes with Congress in the weeks ahead.

Obama can point to a growing economy, rising housing prices, 35 straight months of hiring, and a rebounding stock market. The financial sector has also recovered. Five years after the federal government stepped in and infused banks with $245 billion in taxpayer money to avert a financial meltdown, the government has been paid back nearly in full.

But the public is not convinced that the economy is on the mend. Only one-third say the economic system is more secure now than in 2008, and 52 percent say they disapprove of Obama's handling of the economy, according to a Pew Research Center poll. There is still plenty of pain to justify their pessimism.

Despite job growth, the unemployment rate remains high at 7.3 percent. Though the rate has fallen, one of the reasons is because some people have dropped out of the labor force and no longer are counted as job seekers. The income gap between the very rich and the rest of the population is the biggest since 1928.

What's more, some banks that received government aid because they were deemed "too big to fail" are now bigger than they were in 2008, but they are smaller as a share of the economy than the largest banks in other big economies. Three years after Obama signed a sweeping overhaul of lending and high-finance rules, execution of the law is behind schedule.

This glass-half-empty-glass-half-full state of the economy has produced competing story lines about the role Obama's administration has played in getting the country to this point. Did Obama's approach validate the philosophy of spending your way out of crisis or did some of his policies actually slow the recovery?

In the ABC interview, Obama said globalization and new technology have contributed to the income gap in the country, and it has been building since before the recession.

He argued that his proposals to increase spending on education and public works projects are designed to counter that trend, but face Republican opposition.

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS