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Snowden reporter: Won't be silenced by detention

Spokesman says U.S. was tipped off that man would be detained

By Danica Kirka

Associated Press

Published: Monday, Aug. 19 2013 3:55 p.m. MDT

British police acknowledged that they had detained a 28-year-old man at 8:05 a.m. He was released at 5 p.m. without being arrested, the Metropolitan Police Service said. They have not commented further. The British Home Office didn't comment.

A spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron said that "Schedule 7 forms an essential part of the U.K.'s border security arrangements," but added that it was for the police to decide "when it is necessary and proportionate to use these powers."

Brazil's Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota and his U.K. counterpart William Hague spoke by phone Monday, Britain's embassy in Brasilia said in a statement.

"They agreed that Brazilian and U.K. officials will remain in contact on this issue. This remains an operational matter for the Metropolitan Police," British Ambassador Alex Ellis said in an emailed statement.

The Guardian newspaper reported it paid for Miranda's flights but said that he was not an employee of the newspaper.

"As Glenn Greenwald's partner, he often assists him in his work," the newspaper said in statement. "We would normally reimburse the expenses of someone aiding a reporter in such circumstances."

In an email Monday to The Associated Press, Greenwald said he needed material from Poitras for stories he was working on with her relating to the NSA, and that he had things that she needed.

"David, since he was in Berlin, helped with that exchange," Greenwald wrote.

Greenwald didn't specify what material Miranda may have been carrying. He said that only he and Poitras "have copies of the full archives of NSA documents which Snowden gave to journalists."

David Anderson, Britain's official independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, said he had asked authorities to explain why Miranda was detained and held for so long.

In most cases, those questioned under Schedule 7 are detained for less than an hour.

"It is such a wide power that it would be surprising if it was used perfectly on every occasion," Anderson told the BBC. "It is a very extensive power and this just points up the need to have it properly controlled."

Kirka reported from London. Associated Press writers Josh Lederman and Alicia Caldwell contributed from Washington.

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