Picturing history: Mormon Battalion, Rabbit Ears, N.M.

Published: Wednesday, April 10 2013 5:00 a.m. MDT

After passing through the Oklahoma panhandle, the Mormon Battalion entered what is now the state of New Mexico. In late September 1846, some noted that they could see and were passing a natural landmark known as ?Rabbit Ears Mountain.? These two closely related peaks, above, were one of the best known landmarks on the Santa Fe Trail and, it is said, symbolized the Cimarron Route, which the Battalion was still following at this point. By the time they reached Rabbit Ears, many of the teams and members of the Battalion were failing because of the lack of food and harsh conditions of heat, sand and drought.

Kenneth Mays,

After passing through the Oklahoma panhandle, the Mormon Battalion entered what is now the state of New Mexico.

In late September 1846, some noted that they could see and were passing a natural landmark known as "Rabbit Ears Mountain." These two closely related peaks were one of the best known landmarks on the Santa Fe Trail and, it is said, symbolized the Cimarron Route, which the Battalion was still following at this point.

By the time they reached Rabbit Ears, many of the teams and members of the Battalion were failing because of the lack of food and harsh conditions of heat, sand and drought.

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