Yankees closer Rivera says this is final season

By Mark Didtler

Associated Press

Published: Saturday, March 9 2013 11:27 a.m. MST

New York Yankees pitcher Mariano Rivera, who holds baseball's all-time saves record, announces his plans to retire at the end of the 2013 season during a news conference at Steinbrenner Field Saturday, March 9, 2013 in Tampa, Fla.

Kathy Willens, Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — Saying he made the decision before arriving at spring training, Mariano Rivera announced Saturday that he will retire at the end of the season and hopes to cap his record-setting career by winning another World Series with the New York Yankees.

Rivera was surrounded by family and teammates when he made the announcement during a news conference at the team's complex.

The 43-year-old has a clear vision of how he wants his career to end.

"The last game I hope will be throwing the last pitch in the World Series," he said. "''Winning the World Series, that would be my ambition."

With the entire Yankees' team looking on — including longtime teammates Derek Jeter and Andy Pettitte — Rivera said he knew the time was right for his decision.

"I have just a few bullets left," he said.

Rivera holds the career saves record with 608 and has helped the Yankees win five World Series titles. He is regarded as the greatest closer of all time, whether he's throwing his cut fastball in the regular season or postseason.

"We just have a special relationship," Pettitte said. "I don't know how to explain it. Obviously, when you spent as much time together after as many years as we've been together, you just kind of grow a little closer to one another than you would with other teammates. He's always been there for me."

Rivera missed most of last year after tearing his right knee while shagging flyballs during batting practice in early May. Rivera said he would have retired at the end of last season if he had not gotten hurt.

"I didn't want to leave like that," he said. "I felt like I wanted to give everything."

He also said he wanted to give Yankees fans around the major leagues a chance to see him one more time, knowing this will be the end.

"I'm actually appreciative that we get to enjoy him for one more year," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. "I think he's prepared to go 100 percent. I think he'll have a good year. It's been a real treat for me. I was relaxed when he came into the game as a catcher, and I'm relaxed when he comes into the game as a manager, so that's probably about the highest compliment you can pay a closer."

Rivera's wife and two children were by his side for the news conference. He began by playfully thanking the Yankees for giving him a new contract for two additional years through 2015 — which would break a team policy of not negotiating new deals before the old ones expire.

"It's not too easy when you come to a decision like this," Rivera said, turning serious. "After this year, I will be retired. ... Now you're hearing it from me. It's official now."

While others have proclaimed him the best closer in baseball history, Rivera wouldn't put that label on himself.

"I don't feel myself, the greatest of all time. I'm a team player," he said. "I would love to be remembered as a player who was always there for others."

Yankees general Brian Cashman said he knew Rivera's intention was to retire last season.

"He's irreplaceable," Cashman said. "He is the greatest of all-time. I've known him since he was in the minor leagues, and he's never changed once. You see a lot of players that get a lot of money, become famous and change over time. He hasn't changed a bit. I've got more respect for him as a player and person because of that."

Rivera said he will miss being on the field but not the long travel and many nights in hotels. He will be the last player to wear No. 42 — retired for Jackie Robinson by Major League Baseball in 1997 but allowed to remain for players using it at the time.

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS