Governor: NCAA sanctioned Penn St. to weaken it

By Mark Scolforo

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, Jan. 2 2013 1:22 p.m. MST

The late football coach's family released a statement Wednesday saying they were encouraged by the lawsuit. Corbett "now realizes, as do many others, that there was an inexcusable rush to judgment" in the aftermath of the Sandusky scandal, the statement said.

State and congressional lawmakers from Pennsylvania have objected to using the NCAA's fine to finance activities in other states. Penn State has already made the first $12 million payment, and an NCAA task force is deciding how it should be spent.

Republican U.S. Rep. Charlie Dent called that "unacceptable and unsatisfactory."

Last week, state Sen. Jake Corman, a Republican whose district includes Penn State's main campus, said he plans to seek court action barring any of the first $12 million from being released to groups outside the state.

Sandusky, 68, was convicted in June on charges he sexually abused 10 boys, some on Penn State's campus. He's serving a 30- to 60-year state prison term.

Eight young men testified against him, describing a range of abuse they said went from grooming and manipulation to fondling, oral sex and anal rape when they were boys.

Sandusky has maintained his innocence, acknowledging he showered with boys but insisting he never molested them.

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