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Idaho falconers channel history of hunting

They practice skills once used in Middle East, China and Europe

By John Miller

Associated Press

Published: Monday, Dec. 31 2012 10:24 p.m. MST

Gary Moon poses with his young prairie falcon, Laser, near Kuna in the southern Idaho desert last fall.

Associated Press

KUNA, Idaho — Gary Moon releases "Laser," his young prairie falcon, as the sun's first rays set southern Idaho's desert horizon ablaze. The two-pound female, a tiny radio transmitter strapped to each leg, lifts from Moon's leather gauntlet and with every rapid wing beat circles higher into the sky.

Moon, a semi-retired 70-year-old businessman and mechanic from Boise, waits until his bird soars to 400 feet before sprinting toward a pond. With no ducks on the water, however, he reaches inside a sack at his side, flinging a homing pigeon aloft. Instinctively, Laser dives; only a last-second maneuver keeps the pigeon from becoming falcon fodder.

"Anybody can go out with a gun and get a limit of ducks in a few hours," said Moon, who 53 years ago pulled his first bird, a young red-tailed hawk, from its nest and was bitten by the falcon bug for life. "With falcons, it's the lure of the unexpected."

With its arid southern plain scoured with deep river canyons, Idaho is raptor country. More than 700 pairs nest each spring in the 485,000-acre Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area south of Boise. Moon's Laser has plenty of wild company, with up to 200 prairie falcon pairs, the highest breeding density in the world — along with American kestrels, golden eagles, red-tails and fleet peregrine falcons that dive at 200 mph and decorate Idaho's state quarter.

It's also home to a select few who, like Moon, use these birds to hunt.

What they practice today is a remnant of what residents of the Middle East, China and Europe did hundreds or even thousands of years ago: Using birds to scare up a meal. Whether it's a duck or a pheasant, falconers must act quickly after a successful hunt to separate raptor from prey — not unlike nomadic tribesmen in places like Mongolia who still fly giant eagles after small game or even foxes. Other modern day falconers don't eat the prey, but hunt for the sport only — and to provide their birds with food.

"It's watching something that happens every day in nature, but you get to do it up close and personal," said Boise falconer Bob Collins, who flies a gyrfalcon and a peregrine.

Falconers are active in many states. Moon joined more than 300 people from around the world this fall hunting with falcons in Kearney, Neb., during the annual meeting of the International Association of Falconry and Conservation of Birds of Prey.

In Idaho, about 160 people have state raptor permits, according to a 2011 Department of Fish and Game survey. They reported harvesting 700 game birds, half of them ducks. That's just a sliver of the 210,000 ducks shot by all 14,100 licensed hunters in Idaho in 2011.

"They're really dedicated to making sure that their tradition stays alive," said Jeff Knetter, upland game and waterfowl biologist at Fish and Game, the agency that regulates falconry in Idaho.

Some animal rights groups have questioned the practice of keeping wild birds captive. That's one reason the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service outlines strict requirements for people who want to hold raptors, to prevent them from being exploited.

In Idaho, falconers must buy a $29 state license and a $100 federal license, as well as serve a two-year apprenticeship under a master falconer with at least seven years of experience.

Before unleashing their raptors on ducks, pheasant or even sage grouse, every falconer must buy a general hunting license.

Would-be falconers also must pass a written test even experienced falconers say is difficult. Idaho Fish and Game also inspects their raptor houses, known as "mews." Moon's mews, at his home in a neighborhood just south of Boise's downtown, consists of a storage shed with three 10-by-10 dog kennels for his birds.

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