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President Obama talks taxes, fiscal cliff and Petraeus in postelection news conference

By Pete Yost

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012 7:03 p.m. MST

A lawyer for Allen released a statement promising the general would cooperate fully with the Defense Department inspector general's investigation.

"To the extent that there are questions about certain communications by General Allen, he shares in the desire to resolve those questions as completely and quickly as possible," said Col. John Baker, chief defense counsel of the Marine Corps. Allen has denied any wrongdoing.

In early June, Kelley herself received the first of as many as five emails sent from different anonymous accounts alleging that she was up to no good, the person close to Kelley said. One of those mentioned Petraeus by name. By the end of June or early July, Kelley contacted an FBI agent in Tampa she had met at least a year earlier, which began the agency's investigation of the matter. The agent's name is Frederick W. Humphries, 47, a veteran counterterrorism investigator in the Tampa office.

The FBI is reviewing Humphries' conduct in this case, a federal law enforcement official said Wednesday. Specifically the bureau is reviewing a telephone call he made in late October to Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., to voice concern that the bureau was not aggressively pursuing a possible national security breach. Reichert arranged to convey the information to House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia, who checked with the FBI at that time. Cantor was assured the bureau was on top of any possible vulnerability.

Lawrence Berger, the general counsel for the Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association, said in an interview that his client, Humphries, did nothing wrong and should not be disciplined. "He's committed no misconduct," Berger said and predicted he would be cleared of any misconduct.

Earlier, it was learned that sometime before this investigation, Humphries had sent Kelley photos of him shirtless. Over the summer, FBI executives told Humphries to steer clear of the developing Kelley case because they had concerns he had become too personally involved.

Kelley met Humphries when she attended the bureau's Citizens' Academy, an FBI program aimed at showing members of the public at least some of what the FBI does and how it works, Berger said.

Officials who have seen the communications between Allen and Kelley on Wednesday described some of the emails as "suggestive," and said their release would be embarrassing for the general. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the situation publicly.

With Broadwell and Kelley suddenly in the center of the storm, small details suddenly became topics for discussion.

Word surfaced Wednesday that Kelley's pass to enter MacDill Air Force Base in Florida had been indefinitely suspended, a decision made at the base level. Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Steven Warren said Kelley still can enter the base but must report to the visitor center and sign in like others without a pass.

Separately, a U.S. official said the Army has suspended Broadwell's security clearance. As a former Army intelligence officer, she held a high security clearance. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the source was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.

Broadwell, who lives in Charlotte, N.C., was spotted in Washington at her brother's home late Tuesday. Her listing in her high school yearbook in Bismarck, N.D., as "most likely to be remembered" took on new meaning.

FBI Director Robert Mueller and Deputy Director Sean Joyce met privately with legislators on both sides of the Capitol on Wednesday to explain how the investigation unfolded. They met first with Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and ranking Republican Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, then crossed the Capitol to meet with the House Intelligence Committee.

Acting CIA Director Michael Morell went before the House panel next, after meeting a day earlier with top Senate intelligence officials to explain the CIA's take on events that led to Petraeus' resignation.

The questioning on Capitol Hill will continue on Thursday.

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