Falling temps add urgency to superstorm recovery

By Michael Rubinkam

Associated Press

Published: Sunday, Nov. 4 2012 12:48 p.m. MST

President Barack Obama visits the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for an update on the recovery from Hurricane Sandy that hit New York and New Jersey especially hard as well as much of the East Coast earlier this week, Saturday morning, Nov. 3, 2012, in Washington. He is joined by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, right, as he displays a photo of an Air Force C-17 transporting utility trucks to aid the devastated areas. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

J. Scott Applewhite, AP

NEW YORK — Storm victims went to church Sunday to pray for deliverance as cold weather settling in across the New York metropolitan area — and another drenching in the forecast — added to the misery of people already struggling with gasoline shortages and power outages.

Hundreds of parishioners in parkas, scarves and boots packed the pews and stood in the aisles for Mass at a chilly Church of St. Rose in storm-ravaged Belmar, N.J., where the floodwaters had receded but the streets were slippery with strong-smelling mud. Firefighters and police officers sat in the front rows and drew applause.

Roman Catholic Bishop David O'Connell said he had no good answer for why God would allow the destruction that Superstorm Sandy caused.

But he assured parishioners: "There's more good, and there's more joy, and there's more happiness in life than there is the opposite. And it will be back. And we will be back."

With temperatures dipping into the 30s overnight and close to 700,000 homes and businesses in New York City, its northern suburbs and Long Island still without electricity six days after the storm, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that many homes are becoming uninhabitable and that tens of thousands of people are going to need other places to stay.

Over the weekend, the city opened warming shelters in areas without power and Mayor Michael Bloomberg urged elderly people without heat to move to them. The city also began handing out 25,000 blankets to those who insisted on staying in their homes.

"Please, I know sometimes people are reticent to take advantage of services. The cold really is something that is dangerous," Bloomberg said.

Staten Island resident Sara Zavala had no power and was relying on a propane heater, but she was using it only during the day. She didn't want to go to sleep with it running at night.

"When I woke up, I was like, 'It's freezing.' And I thought, 'This can't go on too much longer,'" Zavala said. "And whatever this is we're breathing in, it can't be good for you. Mildew and chemicals and gasoline."

A rainy storm was in the forecast for the middle of the week, worrying those who got slammed by Sandy.

"Well, the first storm flooded me out, and my landlord tells me there's a big crack in the ceiling, so I guess there's a chance this storm could do more damage," John Lewis said at a shelter in New Rochelle, N.Y. "I was hoping to get back in there sooner rather than later, but it doesn't look good."

After the abrupt cancellation of Sunday's New York City Marathon, some of those who had been planning to run the 26.2-mile race through the city streets instead headed to hard-hit Staten Island to volunteer to help storm victims.

Thousands of other runners from such countries as Italy, Germany and Spain poured into Central Park to hold impromptu races of their own. A little more than four laps through the park amounted to a marathon.

"A lot of people just want to finish what they've started," said Lance Svendsen, organizer of a group called Run Anyway.

Though New York and New Jersey bore the brunt of the destruction, at its peak, the storm reached 1,000 miles across, killed more than 100 people in 10 states, knocked out power to 8.5 million homes and businesses and canceled nearly 20,000 flights. Damage has been estimated $50 billion, making Sandy the second most expensive storm in U.S. history, behind Hurricane Katrina.

More than 900,000 homes and businesses in New Jersey were still without electricity.

With fuel deliveries cut off by storm damage and many metropolitan-area gas stations lacking the electricity needed to operate their pumps, drivers waited in line for hours for a chance at a fill-up, snapping at each other and honking their horns in frustration.

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