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Mitt Romney, President Barack Obama each get something in jobs report (+video)

By Julie Pace

Associated Press

Published: Friday, Nov. 2 2012 8:54 a.m. MDT

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama shake hands as moderator Bob Schieffer looks on during the third presidential debate at Lynn University, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Charlie Neibergall, Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney each got new evidence to bolster his closing argument Friday from an economic report showing more job creation and an uptick in unemployment.

With that final snapshot of the nation's economy before Election Day in hand, both candidates were plunging into a hectic pace of campaigning. Obama was eager to fend off Romney in the key battleground of Ohio even as Romney pushed to expand the contest to other states, most notably Pennsylvania, to secure the 270 electoral votes needed to win.

The Labor Department reported that U.S. employers added 171,000 jobs in October and that hiring was stronger over the previous two months than first thought. The unemployment rate inched up to 7.9 percent from 7.8 percent in September because the workforce grew.

As an economic marker, the report sketched a picture of a job market that is gradually gaining momentum after nearly stalling in the spring. More jobs were created than predicted, and the higher rate means more people are returning to the labor force, since the government only counts people as unemployed if they are actively searching for work.

As a political marker, it gives Romney a data point to attack. Obama will face voters with the highest unemployment rate of any incumbent since Franklin Roosevelt.

"Today's increase in the unemployment rate is a sad reminder that the economy is at a virtual standstill," Romney said in a statement. "When I'm president, I'm going to make real changes that lead to a real recovery, so that the next four years are better than the last."

Still, the jobs report alone is unlikely to sway voters. Few if any remain undecided and they have shown throughout the year not to be susceptible to positive or negative monthly changes in the unemployment rate.

Friday's report comes amid other signs that the economy is on the mend. Most important, consumer confidence is up to its highest level since February 2008, according to the Conference Board. Other signposts this week showed auto companies with sales gains in October and increases in factory orders and production.

"While more work remains to be done, today's employment report provides further evidence that the U.S. economy is continuing to heal from the wounds inflicted by the worst downturn since the Great Depression," Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Alan Krueger said in a statement distributed in response to the jobs report by the White House. "It is critical that we continue the policies that are building an economy that works for the middle class as we dig our way out of the deep hole that was caused by the severe recession that began in December 2007."

Ohio loomed large on the campaign calendar Friday, with Obama scheduling three stops in that crucial battleground. He had larger rallies in more urban areas elsewhere planned for the weekend. Romney was set to hold two rallies in Ohio — the second a large evening kickoff for the final weekend of campaigning with running mate Paul Ryan, their wives and performer Kid Rock.

Romney, who doesn't usually speak from a written text at campaign events, but planned to outline his closing pitch in prepared remarks at an event earlier Friday in Wisconsin.

But while Ohio was emerging as the most contested state in the final push, Romney and the Republican Party were launching a new drive into Pennsylvania, a state that had been considered safely in Obama's column. Romney planned to campaign in the state Sunday and the Republican National Committee was putting $3 million in ads into Pennsylvania.

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