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Mitt Romney begins closing argument with speech promising to revitalize economy

By Steve Peoples

Associated Press

Published: Friday, Oct. 26 2012 1:54 p.m. MDT

Still, the two are locked in a dead heat in the nationwide poll. Other surveys show a tight race in the swing states that will decide the election, with the winning candidate needing 270 Electoral College votes. With Hurricane Sandy threatening the East Coast during the final full week of the campaign, Romney canceled a rally in Virginia scheduled for Sunday. Obama aides said they were watching the storm's path before deciding whether to call off any of his events.

Obama was pushing back on Romney's criticism on another front — relations with Israel, which could have an impact particularly with Jewish voters in swing state Florida. The Republican has repeatedly criticized Obama for not traveling to Israel as president. Obama visited as a candidate in 2008.

A new ad shows images of Obama's trip and video of his pledge during his final debate with Romney that Iran will not get a nuclear weapon while he's president and that "our bond with Israel will be unbreakable."

Romney spokeswoman Amanda Henneberg responded that Obama's Middle East policy "has been a failure."

"As president, Mitt Romney's first overseas trip will be to Jerusalem, and under a Romney Administration, the world will never question America's solidarity with Israel," she said in a statement.

Romney was expanding his TV advertising into Minnesota, where President Richard Nixon was the last Republican to carry the state 40 years ago. The investment is described as a small buy that Democrats suggest is simply intended to generate media coverage and force the incumbent campaign to spend money there as well. And Obama's campaign followed suit, going up with what it described as a small buy meant to reach voters in neighboring Wisconsin.

Romney's running mate Paul Ryan also spent time in states not expected to affect the race's outcome, with fundraisers in South Carolina and Alabama. Ryan was scheduled to join Romney for a rally Friday evening in North Canton, Ohio, before the vice presidential candidate embarks on a two-day, 400-mile bus tour of the state.

At a midday luncheon in Huntsville, Ala., that raised more than $1 million for Romney's campaign, Ryan told donors they were helping pay for television ads in battleground states and staff to get voters to their polling locations. "Historically, Republicans have not been as good at that," Ryan said. "We're getting a lot better."

Vice President Joe Biden, campaigning Friday in Wisconsin, said Romney "meant what he said" when he was caught on tape saying that 47 percent of the nation considers themselves victims.

"Romney talks about victims. I don't know where the hell he lives," Biden told about 1,000 people at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. "I don't recognize the country he's talking about." The Obama campaign has a radio ad playing heavily in Wisconsin keying off of Romney's 47 percent line and using it to question the Republican's priorities. Both Romney and Ryan plan to campaign in Wisconsin early next week.

Obama arrived back in Washington late Thursday following a 40-hour battleground state blitz of eight states. He took a one-day break from the campaign trail Friday, spending much of the day at the White House, with a trip to Democratic Party headquarters to film a live appearance on MTV. Turning out young voters who tend to vote Democratic is a key strategy for the Obama campaign. He was scheduled to campaign in New Hampshire on Saturday.

The president also planned Oval Office interviews Friday with American Urban Radio Networks, which has a largely black audience, and Michael Smerconish, the conservative-leaning radio host who backed him in the 2008 election.

Obama also planned to talk to local television stations in swing states. And the campaign announced Friday that the president will travel next week to Colorado, Wisconsin and Ohio for a series of campaign rallies and events.

Pickler reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Julie Pace in Washington and Philip Elliott in Huntsville, Ala., contributed to this report.

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