President Obama assails Mitt Romney in bid for women's vote

By Kasie Hunt

Associated Press

Published: Thursday, Oct. 25 2012 6:22 a.m. MDT

President Barack Obama makes an order during unannounced visit to Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012, in Tampa, Fla. Obama, who traveled to Florida for a campaign event nearby, surprised local patrons when he drove up in the morning.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — Seeking to shore up his support among women voters, President Barack Obama on Thursday hammered Republican rival Mitt Romney anew over his backing of Richard Mourdock, the Indiana Senate candidate drawing fire for saying that pregnancies that result from rape are "something God intended."

"Unlike some other leaders in the Republican Party, like John McCain, Mitt Romney hasn't questioned his endorsement of Richard Mourdock or ever once stood up to the most extreme elements of his own party. Instead, he tapes ads for them," Obama's campaign says in an online video. His aides haven't ruled out the possibility of using a similar message in TV ads in battleground states in the coming days as the president looks to break open a race national polls show is close.

While a Romney campaign aide has said he disagreed with Mourdock's remark, the Republican presidential nominee is standing by Mourdock and hasn't asked the Indiana state treasurer to take down a TV ad Romney filmed for him earlier this week.

Beyond the statement from an aide, the Republican nominee and his aides have worked to avoid the subject. Romney did not speak to reporters or address Mourdock's remarks during two public appearances Wednesday. His aides sometimes speak to reporters traveling on Romney's campaign plane but did not appear Wednesday, and were scarce at Romney's rallies. They ignored repeated emailed questions about Mourdock.

Made in a debate Tuesday with Democratic Rep. Joe Donnelly, Mourdock's comment thrust a contentious social issue back into the presidential race less than two weeks before Election Day and with early voting underway in many states.

National polls show the race is close, though Romney is struggling to overtake Obama in the state-by-state march to racking up the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory. Romney has far fewer paths to reaching that threshold than Obama, who starts with more states — and more Electoral College votes — in his win column. The race is centered on just nine states, where polls show competitive races: Ohio, Florida, Iowa, New Hampshire, Virginia, North Carolina, Colorado, Nevada and Wisconsin.

In several of those states, women voters hold the key.

After trailing Obama for months among women voters, Romney has started gaining ground in recent weeks. A new Associated Press-GfK poll released Thursday shows that Romney has erased Obama's 16-point advantage among women, while the president, in turn, has largely eliminated Romney's edge among men.

Obama aides see Romney's refusal thus far to pull his support for Mourdock as an opportunity to cast the GOP nominee as extreme on women's health issues and expose what they say is Romney's attempts to moderate those views for political gain.

On "The Tonight Show" Wednesday, Obama criticized Mourdock for his comments, saying "rape is rape" and distinctions offered by the Republican candidate "don't make any sense to me."

Obama was campaigning with all the signs that his presidency is on the line, crossing the country Wednesday with rallies in Iowa, Colorado and Nevada and appearing on the "The Tonight Show" in California. On Thursday, Obama was so not much starting his day as continuing his last one. After spending the night on Air Force One, he was campaigning in Tampa, Fla., Richmond, Va., and Cleveland before heading back to the White House.

Shortly after 7 a.m. and less than five hours after his day ended in Las Vegas, Obama was at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop near downtown Tampa, and minutes later he delivered the still warm doughnuts to a firehouse in Tampa. He said he wanted to come by early — noting he is not often out this early — to say thank you for all they did.

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