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Mexico capo killed, then body stolen by gunmen

By Michael Weissenstein

Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Oct. 9 2012 4:30 p.m. MDT

Officials said that with Lazcano's body missing, the remaining evidence of his fall consists of three fingerprints and a few photos of a body believed to be the man who helped define the devastating struggle among Mexico's drug gangs and authorities. The navy released two of the photos, showing the puffy, slack face of a corpse whose features, particularly his flaring nostrils, appeared to match the few known photos of Lazcano.

Coahuila state Attorney General Homero Ramos said that around 1 p.m. Sunday outside a stadium in the town of Progreso, marines spotted a suspicious vehicle that had previously been seen with armed men inside.

The marines ordered the vehicle to stop and the men inside opened fire, setting off a gunbattle. The driver was killed in the vehicle. The other man fled and was shot approximately 900 feet away, dropping an AR-15 assault rifle with an attached grenade launcher, Ramos said.

Officials also found a rocket-propelled grenade launcher with two projectiles, two fragmentation grenades and a variety of firearms in the vehicle, Ramos said.

One man's driver license identified him as a 44-year-old resident of the nearby city of Sabinas. The other body had no ID. The bodies were taken to a funeral home in Sabinas and investigators took their fingerprints and photographs, officials said.

Early Monday morning, Ramos said, a group of armed men raided the funeral home and forced the director to drive the hearse with the corpses to another location. He did not offer further details.

Ramos and the Mexican navy said the fingerprints of one man were later found to match Lazcano's, although they did not say when that discovery was made.

Lazcano, who is also known as "El Verdugo" (the Executioner), was credited with bringing military tactics and training to the enforcement arm of the once-powerful Gulf Cartel, then splitting from his former bosses and turning the Zetas into one of the country's two most potent cartels.

The Zetas were the first Mexican cartel to publicly display their beheaded rivals, most infamously two police officers in April 2006 in the resort city of Acapulco. The severed heads were found on spikes outside a government building with a message signed "Z'' that said: "So that you learn to respect."

Under Lazcano's leadership, the Zetas recruited more hit men, many of them former Mexican soldiers, and hired "kaibiles," Guatemalan soldiers trained in counterinsurgency.

Most recently, the cartel was linked to last week's assassination of the nephew of the governor of Coahuila, a slaying that prompted the federal government to dispatch additional troops, federal police and criminal investigators to the state. Some local officials said they believed the killing may have been carried out by Trevino, the other Zetas top boss, in revenge for the killing of his own nephew by an elite state police force the same day.

Grabbing the bodies of fallen accomplices is a trademark of the Zetas, who have retained some of the tactics and institutional culture of the military deserters who founded the group, Grayson said.

"The Zetas take care of their dead," he said. "El Lazca was special forces. There is an esprit de corps, like the Marines. They never leave a comrade behind."

Mexican authorities have announced a string of arrests of high-profile Zetas figures in recent months, and have said they believe a rift had emerged between Ivan Velazquez Caballero, a Zetas leader known as "El Taliban" nabbed by authorities last month, and Trevino, a Zetas capo known as "Z40" who has a reputation for being even more brutal. It was not clear which side Lazcano was on.

On Monday, the Mexican navy said it had arrested a regional leader for the Zetas, Salvador Alfonso Martinez, or "Squirrel," and believed he was involved in many of the Zetas' worst crimes. The high-profile arrests yield intelligence for other arrests, experts say.

In late September, marines grabbed Ivan Velazquez Caballero, a Zetas leader known as "El Taliban," and also recently caught the heads of the two main factions of the Gulf Cartel: Jorge Eduardo "El Coss" Costilla Sanchez, and Mario Cardenas Guillen.

Lazcano was born in 1974, according to the U.S., or 1975, according to Mexican officials. He is suspected in hundreds of killings, including the June 2004 slaying of Francisco Ortiz Franco, a top editor of a crusading weekly newspaper in Tijuana that often reported on drug trafficking. Ortiz Franco was gunned down in front of his two young children as he left a clinic.

The United States offered a $5 million reward and Mexico an additional $2.3 million for information leading to Lazcano's arrest.

Associated Press writers Olga R. Rodriguez, Adriana Gomez Licon, Katherine Corcoran and Mark Stevenson contributed to this report.

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