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Hezbollah leads massive anti-US protest in Lebanon

By Zeina Karam

Associated Press

Published: Monday, Sept. 17 2012 2:16 p.m. MDT

Afghan religious leaders urged calm after protests broke out in Kabul.

"Our responsibility is to show a peaceful reaction, to hold peaceful protests. Do not harm people, their property or public property," said cleric Karimullah Saqib.

On the main thoroughfare through the city, demonstrators burned tires, shipping containers and at least one police vehicle before they were dispersed. Police shot in the air to prevent about 800 protesters from pushing toward government buildings downtown, said Azizullah, a police officer at the site who, like many Afghans, only goes by one name.

More than 20 police officers were slightly injured, most by rocks, said Gen. Fahim Qaim, the commander of a city quick-reaction police force.

The rallies will continue "until the people who made the film go to trial," said Kabul protester, Wahidullah Hotak, among several dozen people demonstrating in front of a mosque, demanding President Barack Obama bring the makers of the video to justice.

Several hundred demonstrators in northwestern Pakistan clashed with police after setting fire to a press club and a government building, said police official Mukhtar Ahmed. The protesters apparently attacked the press club in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province's Upper Dir district because they were angry their rally wasn't getting more coverage, he said.

Police charged the crowd in the town of Wari, beating protesters back with batons, Ahmad said. The demonstrators then attacked the office of a senior government official and surrounded a local police station, said Ahmad, who locked himself inside with several other officers.

One protester died when police and demonstrators exchanged fire, and several others were wounded, police official Akhtar Hayat said.

Several hundred people chanted slogans and burned an American flag outside the U.S. Consulate in the eastern city of Lahore. Some who tried to reach the wall of the consulate scuffled with baton-wielding police.

Hundreds battled police for a second day in the southern city of Karachi as they tried to reach the U.S. Consulate. Police lobbed tear gas and fired in the air to disperse the protesters, who were from the student wing of the Jamaat-e-Islami party. Police arrested 40 students, but no injuries were reported, said senior police officer Asif Ejaz Shaikh.

Pakistanis have also held many peaceful protests against the film, including one in the southwest town of Chaman on Monday attended by around 3,000 students and teachers.

The chief justice of Pakistan's Supreme Court ordered the government's telecommunications authority to block access to the film. Government officials have said they are trying to block the video, as well as other content considered blasphemous, but it was still viewable Monday on YouTube.

Hundreds of Indonesians clashed with police outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, hurling rocks and firebombs and setting tires on fire.

At least 10 police were taken to the hospital after being hit with rocks and attacked with bamboo sticks, said Police Chief Maj. Gen. Untung Rajad. He said four protesters were arrested and one was hospitalized.

Demonstrators burned a picture of Obama and also tried to ignite a fire truck parked outside the embassy after ripping a water hose off the vehicle and torching it. Police used a bullhorn to appeal for calm and deployed water cannons and tear gas to try to disperse the crowd.

"We will destroy America like this flag!" a protester screamed while burning a U.S. flag. "We will chase away the American ambassador from the country!"

Demonstrations were also held Monday in the Indonesian cities of Medan and Bandung.

German authorities are considering whether to ban the public screening of the film because it could endanger public security, Chancellor Angela Merkel said. A fringe far-right political party says it plans to show the film in Berlin in November.

Iran's top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called on Western countries to block the film to prove they are not "accomplices" in a "big crime," according to Iranian state TV.

U.S. officials say they cannot limit free speech and Google Inc. refuses to do a blanket ban on the YouTube video clip. This leaves individual countries putting up their own blocks.

Associated Press writers Heidi Vogt in Kabul, Abdullah Khan in Timergarah, Pakistan, Adil Jawad in Karachi, Pakistan, Niniek Karmini in Jakarta, Indonesia, and Matthew Lee in Washington contributed to this report.

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