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The winners and the losers

Published: Saturday, Aug. 25 2012 12:00 a.m. MDT

Winner: As game shows go, television is littered with some rather strange and unproductive offerings. "Queen for a Day" had women competing to see who had the most pathetic existence. And what was the point of signing up to be mercilessly insulted by a insufferable host on "The Weakest Link?" Against that backdrop, a game show that tests people's knowledge of the Bible sounds downright uplifting. We have no doubt "The American Bible Challenge" on GSN will have its lighter side. Host Jeff Foxworthy will see to that. But if it catches on, the worst that could happen is that some people will learn a thing or two to help them out in life.

Loser: Authorities arrested a man in Taylorsville this week who apparently decided he would rather jeopardize his son than get a speeding ticket. Brian Eddis Johnson, 42, was arrested finally at his mother's house, after officials say he briefly tried to barricade himself. He had fled police on his motorcycle after they allegedly spotted him speeding. At one point, he stopped and apparently threw his 13-year-old son off the bike, causing the boy to hit his face on the ground. He may not have avoided the speeding ticket, but thanks to charges of felony child abuse, aggravated assault on a police officer and felony fleeing, it no longer will be the main focus of his worries.

Winner: The owners of a new pizza shop in Salem deserve kudos for making a traffic jam a little more bearable last week. When an accident on I-15 shut down traffic in Orem, Graig Nielson decided to put the 10 pizzas he was delivering on the hood of his car and invite anyone around to take a slice. Lots of people did so, forming an impromptu party that ended when police finally cleared the mess. The people expecting the deliveries may not have appreciated the generosity, but the world could use a little more spontaneous kindness.

Loser: News this week that a former Navy SEAL has written a book about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden was dismaying. While the author has every right to write such a book, doing so apparently violated an unwritten code among Navy SEAL forces, who value stealth and eschew the spotlight. He also may have put himself and other members of the team in danger from bin Laden sympathizers looking for revenge. That's hardly worth the price of a few interesting details.

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