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Picturing history: Sarah Kimball home

Published: Wednesday, Aug. 15 2012 5:00 a.m. MDT

Following her arrival in Nauvoo, Sarah Melissa Granger met and fell in love with local landowner Hiram Kimball. The two married in 1840 and lived in the 11?2-story home, above. Hiram was not a member of the LDS Church until his baptism in 1843. Being in one of the few Nauvoo families of some means, Sarah offered to furnish material to make clothes for men laboring on the Nauvoo Temple if some of the other women would help her sew them. Meeting in Sarah?s home, that group of women organized a ladies? society complete with written bylaws. This group was later formally organized into the Nauvoo Female Relief Society, now Relief Society, by the Prophet Joseph Smith. Sarah moved to Utah in 1851 and served as president of the 15th Ward Relief Society from 1857 until her passing in 1898. She was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery, right.

Kenneth Mays,

Following her arrival in Nauvoo, Ill., Sarah Melissa Granger met and fell in love with local landowner Hiram Kimball. The two married in 1840 and lived in the 1½-story home, above.

Hiram was not a member of the LDS Church until his baptism in 1843.

Being in one of the few Nauvoo families of some means, Sarah offered to furnish material to make clothes for men laboring on the Nauvoo Temple if some of the other women would help her sew them. Meeting in Sarah's home, that group of women organized a ladies' society complete with written bylaws. This group was later formally organized into the Nauvoo Female Relief Society, now Relief Society, by the Prophet Joseph Smith.

Sarah moved to Utah in 1851 and served as president of the 15th Ward Relief Society from 1857 until her passing in 1898. She was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.

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