Mitt Romney says Pres. Obama, allies perpetuating lies in ads

By Kasie Hunt

Associated Press

Published: Thursday, Aug. 9 2012 12:54 p.m. MDT

President Barack Obama is shown an old photograph by Robert Romero, owner of Romero's Cafe and Catering, right, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012, in Pueblo, Colo. Also at the counter with Obama Virginia Romero, left, who founded the establishment.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

NEW YORK — Mitt Romney on Thursday accused President Barack Obama and his allies of launching personal attacks and perpetuating lies about him in TV ads. The Republican also rolled out a new commercial of his own that questioned Obama's values and accused the president of waging war on religious freedom.

Obama's campaign disputed that charge.

"I am seeing some of the ads out there. I don't know whatever happened to a campaign of hope and change," Romney said, alluding to Obama's previous campaign slogan, during an interview on Bill Bennett's radio program, "Morning in America." ''I thought he was a new kind of politician. But instead, his campaign and the people working with him have focused almost exclusively on personal attacks ... It's really disappointing."

In the interview, Romney argued that Obama "keeps on just running" ads that various fact-checking organizations have called inaccurate. "They just blast ahead," he said, instead of pulling the ads off the air. But the candidate ignored the fact that he has kept his own ads assailing Obama on the air after these groups have found their claims to be false.

Romney talked generally about ads in the interview but didn't directly refer to a commercial by a Democratic outside group that has dominated the campaign in the last two days.

His campaign has called "despicable" an ad by Priorities USA Action that features a man whose wife died of cancer after he lost his health insurance when he was laid off from a company that was bought by the private equity firm Romney once ran. "I do not think Mitt Romney realizes what he's done to anyone, and furthermore I do not think Mitt Romney is concerned," the man, Joe Soptic, says in the ad.

Obama's campaign has refused to ask the group to pull the spot. Speaking at a rally in Pueblo, Colo., Obama bemoaned the influence of super PACs supporting Romney. He told voters they would see "more negative ads, more money spent than you have ever seen in your life." He made no mention of similar groups supporting his campaign.

Bill Burton, a former White House aide and a co-founder of Priorities USA Action, said the ad does not suggest that Romney was responsible for Soptic's wife's death.

"We're not saying Mitt Romney is culpable," Burton told CNN.

The back and forth over the commercial underscored the degree to which the White House campaign has become intensely negative and personal as polls show the race close three months before the Nov. 6 election. Negative commercials from both the candidates and their backers are flooding the roughly nine states that are the most competitive in the hunt to win the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory.

As controversy raged over the outside group's commercial, Romney's team rolled out one of its own Thursday that asks: "Who shares your values?"

It continues: "President Obama used his health care plan to declare war on religion, forcing religious institutions to go against their faith."

The ad did not appear to be running in any television markets Thursday, according to a Democrat who tracks ad buys. The Romney campaign says it's expected to begin airing Friday, but refused to say where or for how long.

The spot revives a months-old debate over new health rules mandating insurance coverage for birth control without co-pays. Religious institutions have said the rules would force them to violate their faith. Obama says exemptions for churches and compromise language on charities fully protects religious freedom.

"When religious freedom is threatened, who do you want to stand with?" the ad asks and says the answer is Romney. The ad is on the Web. Romney's campaign said the spot would also be broadcast on television, but didn't specify in which markets.

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