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Mitt Romney praises Polish spirit, creativity in Warsaw

By Kasie Hunt

Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, July 31 2012 8:57 a.m. MDT

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney meets with Poland's former President Lech Walesa, Monday, July 30, 2012, in Artus Court, in Gdansk, Poland.

Charles Dharapak, Associated Press

WARSAW, Poland — Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney said Tuesday that Poland's economy is a model of small government and free enterprise that other nations should emulate, an unspoken criticism of President Barack Obama's policies in the wake of the worst recession in decades.

Wrapping up an overseas trip, the former Massachusetts governor said that "rather than heeding the false promise" of a government-dominated economy, Poland sought to stimulate innovation, attract investment, expand trade and live within its means" after the Communist era.

Shortly before ending his stumble-marred trip, Romney sought to minimize any damage from comments in Israel that sparked strong criticism from Palestinian leaders, saying his words had been mischaracterized.

In an interview with Fox News, he said he "did not speak about the Palestinian culture or the decisions made in their economy" when he told Jewish campaign donors that their own culture is part of the reason the Jewish state is more economically successful than areas where Palestinians live.

Romney also laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Warsaw before flying home to the United States, and paid tribute to the hundreds of thousands of Poles who died in a World War II ghetto uprising against the Nazis. Both are traditional gestures for dignitaries visiting Poland.

His speech seemed an attempt to link his overseas trip to the campaign at home.

He said that in his talks on Monday, one unnamed Polish leader "shared with me an economic truth that has been lost on much of the world. 'It is simple. You don't borrow what you cannot pay back,'" said Romney, who frequently criticizes Obama at home for the growth of the U.S. debt in the past four years.

"The world should pay close attention to the transformation of Poland's economy," Romney said. "A march toward economic liberty and smaller government has meant a march toward higher living standards, a strong military that defends liberty at home and abroad, and an important and growing role on the international stage."

While holding up Poland as an economic example, Romney did not mention that the nation's unemployment is measured at 12.4 percent. Unemployment in the United States is 8.2 percent.

Romney did not mention Obama by name during his speech, but he frequently accuses the president of failing to understand the importance of the private economy and favoring government solutions to the nation's problems.

Romney resumes his campaign at home with appearances Thursday in Colorado.

His aides told reporters that despite any mistakes, the trip had been a success.

Already, they were eager to turn the campaign focus back to the race against Obama.

The campaign issued a statement from its headquarters in Boston noting that the announcement of Romney's selection of a vice presidential running mate is getting closer. It unveiled an app for smartphones that it said would "serve as the campaign's first official distribution channel" for the news.

Controversy accompanied the former Massachusetts governor in Poland as in previous stops in Britain and Israel, and comments he made earlier in the trip drew criticism from China.

Xinhua News Agency said Romney's "hawkish remarks" made in Jerusalem could worsen an already tense Mideast situation, or even re-ignite a war between Palestinians and Israelis.

Earlier this week, he declared Jerusalem to be the capital of Israel, even though U.S. policy holds that the city's designation is a matter for negotiations between the Jewish state and the Palestinians. He also sparked a charge of racism from Palestinians when he told donors that the strength of Israel's economy was due in part to the country's culture.

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