Saudi female athletes fear crackdown after London

By Hassan Ammar

Associated Press

Published: Monday, July 2 2012 3:20 a.m. MDT

In this May 21, 2012 photo, members of a Saudi female soccer team including captain Rawh Abdullah, left, Rana Al Khateeb, center, and American Mawada Chaballout, right, practice at a secret location in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. While Olympic leaders and human rights advocates are encouraged by signs that Saudi Arabia may bow to pressure and send female athletes to the Summer Games, women athletes in the ultraconservative kingdom are worried about a backlash at home.

Hassan Ammar, Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — While Olympic leaders and human rights advocates are encouraged by signs that Saudi Arabia may bow to pressure and send female athletes to the Summer Games, women athletes in the ultraconservative kingdom are worried about a backlash at home.

Under pressure from the International Olympic Committee to end the tradition of sending men-only teams to the Olympics, Saudi Arabia said on Monday it will allow women who qualify to compete at the London Games.

The announcement came as the leadership's favored candidate, equestrian Dalma Rushdi Malhas, was ruled out of the Olympics — sending officials on a hunt for other female athletes they could include on the Saudi team and avoid IOC sanctions a month before the start of the games.

Women who play soccer and basketball in underground leagues around Saudi Arabia support those efforts, yet they also fear the hardline Muslim leaders will punish them for being pressured by the West and will crack down on women's clandestine activities after the Olympic flame goes out in London.

"We have to wait. I am afraid of their reaction, if we push too hard," said Rawh Abdullah, a captain of a female soccer team in the Saudi capital, Riyadh. "We risk being shut down completely, and I do not want to reach a dead end because of impatience."

Also, she added, she and her teammates simply "are not ready to compete on such level" because they cannot train properly.

Abdullah has given up her career as a teacher to run the all-women soccer club Al Tahaddi, Arabic for challenge. Since 2006, when the club was established, 25 team members meet four times a week to play after turning one of the players' gardens into a field.

The 28-year-old Abdullah, who serves as a coach and the captain on the team, charges each member 1,300 riyals ($350) annual fee to play. The money she gets covers players outfits, balls, makeshift goals, some fitness equipment and partly also trips to the port city of Jeddah or Dammam to play exhibition games or matches in the clandestine women's league.

There are no written laws that prohibit women from participating in sports, but women are not allowed into stadiums, and they cannot rent athletic venues. There is no physical education for girls in public schools, and no women-only hours at swimming pools. The few gyms that admit women are too expensive for most to frequent.

Women cannot register sports clubs, league competitions and other female-only tournaments with the government. They are banned from entering all-male national trials, which makes it impossible for them to qualify for international competitions, including the Olympics.

Female athletes like Abdullah fear that sending inadequately prepared athletes to the London Games could do more harm than good to their cause of making sports "part of our lifestyle" and achieve change for millions of women, who's public lives are severely restricted in the kingdom.

"If they do well, it will be OK, but if they have weak performance, they will turn to us, and say, 'See, you pushed, you went, and you lost. You shamed us,'" Abdullah said.

"When we are prepared in four years' time, and they have to send us, we can say to them: 'You want me to go and represent my country? Now train us. Give us facilities to use and coaches to work with, and we will make you proud,'" Abdullah said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Saudi Arabia is the home of Islam's holiest shrines, and women bear the brunt of their nation's deeply conservative values. They are often the target of the unwanted attention of the kingdom's intrusive religious police, who enforce a rigid interpretation of Islamic law and make sure that men and women do not mix in public.

Besides being barred from driving, women are not allowed to vote, and they cannot be members of the Cabinet. They cannot travel either, be admitted to the hospital or take a job without permission from a male guardian.

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