Judge denied Sandusky lawyers' request to resign

By Mark Scolforo

Associated Press

Published: Saturday, June 23 2012 3:01 p.m. MDT

But the trial did present one piece of finality: Sandusky was taken away in handcuffs to the county jail. Sentencing will be in about three months.

Sandusky is one of 272 inmates at the Centre County Correctional Facility, 7 miles from the Penn State campus, and was kept under watch overnight. Rominger said he planned to visit Sandusky on Sunday.

Like other inmates at the jail, Sandusky was allowed to take a small number of items in with him. The options include six pairs of white underwear, white socks and white undershirts, prescription glasses or contact lenses, a wedding band, religious prayer book, no more than 10 personal photographs and 10 letters and no more than 4 inches of legal documents or materials.

Sandusky will be allowed to shower daily and can get visits from his family, friends and lawyers.

The jail did not say whether anyone had gone to see him Saturday. At his home, his wife and three of their adopted children remained inside after returning there Friday night. The window blinds and curtains were drawn.

For Sandusky, there were only three acquittals among the charges related to 10 victims, eight of whom took the stand to describe fondling, forced oral sex and anal rape. Many of the accusers testified that they had told no one of the abuse, which dated as far back as the mid-1990s.

The accuser known in court papers as Victim 6, whose mother alerted authorities in 1998 after Sandusky took him into a shower, broke down in tears upon hearing the verdicts in the courtroom.

The man, now 25, testified that Sandusky called himself the "tickle monster" in a shower assault. He declined to comment to a reporter afterward. His mother said: "Nobody wins. We've all lost."

One of the three counts for which Sandusky was acquitted concerned Victim 6, an indecent assault charge. The man testified that Sandusky had given him a bear hug in the shower.

The other acquittals were an indecent assault charge related to Victim 5, who said Sandusky fondled him in the shower, and an involuntary deviate sexual intercourse charge regarding Victim 2, the boy graduate assistant Mike McQueary said he saw being attacked in a campus shower.

That charge resulted in an acquittal because McQueary did not see penetration, Harper said. But, Harper said, McQueary made it apparent he saw something "that was wrong and extremely sexual."

"We did not have the evidence that that very first charge happened," Harper said.

Amendola was interrupted by cheers from the crowd on the courthouse steps when he said, "The sentence that Jerry will receive will be a life sentence."

Besides the eight accusers who testified, there were two people for whom prosecutors relied on testimony from a university janitor and McQueary, whose account of a sexual encounter between Sandusky and a boy of about 10 years old ultimately led to Paterno's dismissal and the university president's ouster.

Sandusky did not take the stand in his own defense. Rominger said Saturday that factors behind that decision included the emergence of Matt Sandusky's claims to prosecutors.

The ex-assistant coach had repeatedly denied the allegations, and his defense suggested that his accusers had a financial motive to make up stories. His attorneys also painted him as the victim of overzealous police investigators who coached the accusers.

One accuser testified that Sandusky molested him in the locker room showers and in hotels while trying to ensure his silence with gifts and trips to bowl games. He also said Sandusky had sent him "creepy love letters."

Another spoke of forced oral sex and instances of rape in the basement of Sandusky's home, including abuse that left him bleeding. He said he once tried to scream for help, knowing that Sandusky's wife was upstairs, but figured the basement must be soundproof.

Another, a foster child, said Sandusky warned that he would never see his family again if he told anyone what happened.

Defense witnesses, including Dottie Sandusky, described Sandusky's philanthropic work with children over the years, and many spoke in positive terms about his reputation in the community. Prosecutors had portrayed those efforts as an effective means by which Sandusky could camouflage his molestation as he targeted boys who were the same age as participants in The Second Mile, a charity he founded in the 1970s for at-risk youth.

Sandusky's arrest in November led the Penn State trustees to fire Paterno as head coach, saying he exhibited a lack of leadership after fielding a report from McQueary. The scandal also led to the ouster of university President Graham Spanier and criminal charges against two university administrators accused of perjury and failing to properly report suspected child abuse.

The two administrators, athletic director Tim Curley and now-retired vice president Gary Schultz, are fighting the allegations and await trial.

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