Gov. Daniels declines to discuss Purdue presidency

By Tom Lobianco

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, June 20 2012 9:26 a.m. MDT

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels declines to answer questions on reports that he will be named president of Purdue University following an economic developement announcement in Indianapolis, Wednesday, June 20, 2012.

Michael Conroy, Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels declined to talk Wednesday about whether he will be Purdue University's next president.

A day after Indianapolis media reported Daniels will be chosen to replace retiring university president France Cordova, the Republican governor said he plans to complete his term in office that ends in January but would not discuss his future.

"It's just not appropriate," he told reporters following an economic development announcement in Indianapolis. "It's not a topic for today."

Purdue's Board of Trustees is scheduled to vote Thursday on hiring a new president. WISH-TV and The Indianapolis Star, citing anonymous sources, reported Wednesday that Daniels would be the pick to lead the state's second-largest university.

Daniels' office has declined to comment on the reports and Purdue officials have said they won't identify candidates for the job before the vote.

Cordova is retiring next month after five years as leader of the school that has about 75,000 students on its West Lafayette and regional campuses.

Daniels declined last year to seek the Republican presidential nomination, citing family considerations, but has been mentioned as a possible vice presidential running mate to presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney.

The 63-year-old Daniels, who received a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1971 and a law degree from Georgetown University in 1979, would become the first president of Purdue without extensive experience administering higher education.

While refusing to address the Purdue job directly, Daniels said Wednesday that he believes changes are needed to how higher education is approached. He said more people who've attended college have loan debt than degrees and that situation can't be sustained.

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