President Obama backers showing sense of urgency in presidential campaign

By Julie Pace and Jim Kuhnhenn

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, June 13 2012 10:53 p.m. MDT

FILE - In this June 4, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in New York. President Barack Obama and Democrats awoke Wednesday to the cruel reality of June, the political blows from the bitter loss in Wisconsinís gubernatorial recall election and the abysmal jobs numbers could multiply before the month is out. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Carolyn Kaster, AP

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WASHINGTON — A growing chorus of once-confident Democrats now say President Barack Obama could lose the November election.

The hand-wringing reflects real worries among Democrats about Obama's ability to beat Republican rival Mitt Romney, who has proven to be a stronger candidate than many expected. But it's also a political strategy aimed at rallying major donors who may have become complacent.

Interviews with a dozen Democratic strategists and fundraisers across the country show an increased sense of urgency among Obama backers. It follows a difficult two weeks for the president, including a dismal report on the nation's unemployment picture, a Democratic defeat in the Wisconsin governor recall election and an impressive fundraising month for Romney and Republicans.

"We've all got to get in the same boat and start paddling in the same direction, or we're going to have some problems," said Debbie Dingell, a Democratic National Committee member and the wife of Michigan Rep. John Dingell.

"We can't take this for granted," said Peter Burling, a DNC member from New Hampshire. "I intend to be running scared from now until November."

These worries have also prompted some second-guessing of an Obama campaign operation once perceived as run by disciplined message specialists. Democratic pollster Stan Greenberg and former Clinton adviser James Carville this week wrote that Obama's efforts to convince voters that economic conditions are moving in the right direction aren't swaying people.

"We will face an impossible head wind in November if we do not move to a new narrative," the strategists wrote.

Former Democratic Party chairman Don Fowler faulted the Obama camp for not laying more blame on Republicans for the slow economic recovery.

Some Democrats hope the deepening concern among some party faithful could lead to an increase in fundraising.

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